Dirty bird, displaying uncharacteristic behavior

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by DaveMcLaren, Mar 17, 2013.

  1. DaveMcLaren

    DaveMcLaren Out Of The Brooder

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    My Buff Orpington has been displaying uncharacteristic behavoir; that could be due to the introduction of two new birds (a RIR roo and a silky-both from a seemingly carefull breeder.). What I'm more concerned with is that her rear end is covered in poo. It has worsend over the past week. I have also noticed a overall lightening of the color of all of their egg shells and a complete turn around in her behavior- going from very dominant to very passive.They are dealing with a lot of changes, the weather, new birds etc. I suspect the change to their diet may be a leading cause, but I am begining to wonder if something is wrong with her and possibly the others as well. Any thoughts/ suggestions?
     
  2. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    It's a good idea to quarantine, or keep new birds separate from your established flock for at least a month to ensure they are healthy with no communicable diseases. What may be happening is a coccidiosis, a bacterial infection, or compromised immune system. What do you mean by a change of diet? Also could you describe what fresh droppings look like?
     
  3. orangecatrex

    orangecatrex Out Of The Brooder

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    I too have recently brought some "rescue" chickens from a commercial house to my flock. I noticed along with being way over weight and just down right ugly, that their vents are really nasty. Some have runny poo but others have firm poo. I have also noticed the nasty vent has seemed to appear on one of my other chickens. Is this treatable? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  4. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Diarrhea is caused by stress or disease. Try some probiotics/vitamins-electrolytes in the water or feed for a couple days and see if they improve. If they do not improve, get yourself some Zimectrin Gold (horse wormer) and give each bird a small pea sized amount of the paste. Wait 48 hours and give vitamins-electrolytes-probiotics in the water while keeping an eye on droppings to see if the firm up or any worms are deposited. If you see any worms, worm them again 10 days later.

    If the birds still have diarrhea and no worms, by far the best treatment for something like enteritis (the greens,mud fever), or Salmonella is Gentamicin 1/2 cc injected into the breast muscle morning and night for 3-5 days. Gentamicin isn't cheap so you could also use LA-200 1cc injected in the breast and 1cc down the throat, twice a day for 3-5 days.

    Last but not least, it could be Coccidiosis which would require Amprolium (Corid) or Sulfadimethoxine to get rid of. The only way to know for sure is to have a fecal sample tested at a lab.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2013
  5. DaveMcLaren

    DaveMcLaren Out Of The Brooder

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    Well, with the weather change comes bugs and fresh plant growth in their diet (they enjoy having the run of my yard). Her droppings appear to be mostly white- some green, which isn't unusual. I have not had the time to observe her at length to determine consistancy, but evidence suggests loose bowls... I have a bag of "Medicated" crumb feed from when they were chicks. I don't see any specification of the "medicine " contained within the feed. I'm wondering if feeding them that may resolve the issue; or, what I should give them, and where I can find it. Thanks
     
  6. DaveMcLaren

    DaveMcLaren Out Of The Brooder

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    Learning of all of these illnesses makes me fell like I'm in just a bit over my head. Always something new.
     
  7. Nambroth

    Nambroth Fud Lady

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    Blindly medicating might only make things worse. Careful observation of your girls is the best thing do to immediately-- it would be really great if you could observe the droppings carefully, and behaviors. Your birds have different immunities from any new birds bought in.. and vice versa, even if the new birds are completely healthy, they can be hidden carriers.

    The change in behavior to being more passive might be from illness, or it might be because you have introduced a rooster, and he's in charge now. There are too many variables for us to help you without more information, I'm afraid. :( Do your birds all have clear eyes, nostrils, mouths? No discharge or increased sneezing, coughing? Do they eat and drink well?
     
  8. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Spring is high time for the Greens (enteritis). If birds range, they will eventually pick up something. Most all medicated feed carries Amprolium which treats coccidiosis. I wouldn't use it as the amount of Amprolium wouldn't be enough to treat, but only to assist chicks with immunity. Like I said, the only way to know is to have a fecal sample tested at the vet. I don't recommend "blindly" medicating but using what works for some of the most common diseases which are Coccidiosis, bacterial enteritis, worms, and Cholera. Amprolium works for a few strains of Cocci out of nine different ones. Sulfadimethoxine kills the others, in addition to treating Cholera, enteritis, and salmonella. Like all medications, instructions must be followed very closely. If you don't mind spending $100 or more at the vet for a fecal sample, you could do that. Though I prefer to keep my money and use what has worked for me in the past.
     
  9. DaveMcLaren

    DaveMcLaren Out Of The Brooder

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    They have always seemed to eat and drink well. Now, however, the hen in question isn't running to me when I toss a hand full of feed out for them. She is coming far enough to see what I'm up to, but not eating the feed I toss out. I have no way of knowing if she is eating and drinking from the feeder without penning her up in a diffrent house. I spent some time in the yard last week with them, and I didn't notice any signs of illness in their eyes, nose, or mouth; no discharge, coughing or sneezing... I did give them a bit of a cinnimon rasin bagel and animal crackers I had left over from my lunch that day... Her behavior and appearence was normal at that point.
     
  10. Nambroth

    Nambroth Fud Lady

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    Do you know how to check their crop(s) to see if they have eaten? If you are facing the hen head-on, it is at the very base of her neck, slightly on the left. Get your fingers under her breast feathers, but a bit higher, where her wishbone is. You should be able to feel it expand after she has eaten; it can feel soft like a small water balloon (if she's had much to drink), and you should be able to feel particles of the food in there if she's had anything hard, such as grains, crumbles, etc (whatever you feed her). I find that my hens always have full crops right after I feed them, and when they go to roost. You might see if she has food in there a few times a day to get any idea if she's eating or not.

    The location of the crop:
    http://www.1976design.com/blog/images/369b.jpg

    This hen has a very full crop:
    http://phoenicianfarm.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/black-and-red-crop1.jpg
     

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