disappearing eggs

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Eyeshot, Dec 10, 2013.

  1. this morning I was out feeding my chickens and spotted two eggs in one of the nesting boxes, I made note of that so I could collect them later, once I was done feeding the chickens(we have to collect eggs every couple of hours so they don't freeze, if anyone could give me help with that, that would be appreciated). once I was done feeding that coop I had to go over to another coop that we have and feed those chickens, and when I came back to the first coop to get those eggs, they were gone! i would try to keep a close eye on them today, but I have school so I wont be able to. I don't think it was a chicken eating eggs because i was only gone for a few minutes, and there was no evidence of broken eggs.
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I have no idea what the climate is like or what continent you are on where you are, but there are some things that regularly take eggs without leaving a trace. Here in North America, those things are usually snakes, dogs, raccoons, or humans. Raccoons usually don’t carry them that far to eat them, to a nearby safe place like maybe a coop roof or somewhere hidden, so you might find some evidence. Canines like a fox or coyote would swallow the egg whole but they are more likely to be interested in your chickens.

    Occasionally a broody will carry an egg back to her nest, but that is really rare.
     

  3. I do have a broody hen...I live in Colorado, Black Forest (we have a different Black Forest here than what you are probably thinking of) and we do get raccoons, but I don't see how one could have gotten in since I didn't open up the coop today(it's too cold outside and the chickens refuse to go out) the hen house is entirely made of wood, and it only has two openings(one is closed, but if it were open it would lead into their run, and the other is the door that I came through) and a few vents. so Maybe it was a raccoon but the chickens weren't going crazy or anything. :confused:
     
  4. Westtexasdustdevil

    Westtexasdustdevil Out Of The Brooder

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    If it were here I would say 1. Bull snake 2. Human. in that order.
     
  5. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    Too cold for snakes.
     
  6. Mountain Man 60

    Mountain Man 60 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 19, 2013
    Could a hen have carried the eggs under the coop? I have had my hens move eggs from inside the coop to an outside box. One of my hens lays under the coop even in cold weather.
     
  7. Westtexasdustdevil

    Westtexasdustdevil Out Of The Brooder

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    seems my hen house is warm enough. Found a 4 ft bull snake monday enjoying two eggs. Wasnt happy with me at all. Here in a tank awaiting spring so I can release it with no damage.
     
  8. I don't know what it was, I'm finding no bull snakes or anything and my chickens aren't acting weird, so there probably wasn't a raccoon, I still have all my chickens, so it wasn't a dog, I'll just wait till I get Christmas break and keep a close eye on them, thanks everyone for your help, you guys are awesome


    You should eat him, he(or she) ate your eggs! Jk.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2013
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    If a dog has access, it could be a dog. Some of them have been trained to not go after chickens but not trained to leave the eggs alone. Do you have a pet dog that may have learned the egg song is an invitation to a snack? You would not be the first person that happened to.

    I should have mentioned that in my other post.
     

  10. I actually have two dogs, neither are trained. They're very good at keeping away predators, but they are horrible predators themselves and have killed they're fair share of chickens, so they wouldn't go for the eggs if they could get the chickens, which they could do if they could find a way into the chicken coop ;)
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2013

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