disinfecting/preparing for new flock or how to prevent another disaster

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by caliclucker, Nov 6, 2014.

  1. caliclucker

    caliclucker Out Of The Brooder

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    So I had to cull my young flock about a month ago due to what I'm pretty sure was choryza. I want to start over but want to do this right to try and stop this from happening again.

    I plan on completely scrubbing the coop and run. I'm removing all organic material down to the dirt in the run and then bleaching the hell out of it and the coop. I am going to let them sit empty for a while to make sure any remaining choryza bacteria are dead.

    How long should I let it sit empty before introducing new birds?

    Do wild birds carry choryza?

    Is there a vaccine for choryza?

    I really don't want to deal with this again so any advice is appreciated. Help!!

    Thanks!
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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  3. caliclucker

    caliclucker Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks, that does help.

    Do you know if wild birds can transmit it?
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Sorry to hear about your flock, but you did the right thing if it was coryza.

    From The Merck Manual on infectious coryza:

    Infectious coryza is an acute respiratory disease of chickens characterized by nasal discharge, sneezing, and swelling of the face under the eyes. It is found worldwide. The disease is seen only in chickens; reports of the disease in quail and pheasants probably describe a similar disease that is caused by a different etiologic agent.
    In developed countries such as the USA, the disease is seen primarily in pullets and layers and occasionally in broilers. In the USA, it is most prevalent in commercial flocks in California and the southeast, although the northeastern USA has recently experienced significant outbreaks. In developing countries, the disease often is seen in very young chicks, even as young as 3 wk old. Poor biosecurity, poor environment, and the stress of other diseases are likely reasons why infectious coryza is more of a problem there. The disease has no public health significance.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2014
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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  6. caliclucker

    caliclucker Out Of The Brooder

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    So it sounds like wild birds can transmit it only if they are in contact with infected chickens, feed etc. They themselves don't get sick. So if it's been several weeks since I culled my flock and I thoroughly disinfect everything I should be OK with a new flock.

    Unfortunately my last batch of birds was from a feed store and two of them started displaying respiratory symptoms the day after I got them. So I know they came infected. Next time I'm going with a reputable chicken supplier.

    Ugh! What a headache!
     
  7. welasharon

    welasharon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm letting mine sit empty for three months. That has been about the longest of all the recommendations I have seen anywhere. Interesting side note: It seems you cannot bleach soil. The organic matter neutralizes the bleach. All surfaces have to be scrubbed clean of organic matter and then bleached. I too do not want to deal with this again.
     
  8. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    A responsible seller of chicks has an enclosed area where brooders are kept. People are not allowed to poke their fingers in, or have adult chickens housed in the same area. I can't tell you how many times I've seen improper environments in feed stores, filthy water, crowded chicks, etc. Just know that may not have been the case with your chicks from the articles on Coryza Dawg53 posted. If Coryza is in the environment at home, you may consider vaccination. The coryza vaccination is easy since it is given subcutaneous once and again 3-4 weeks later. For disinfectant, TekTrol and Virkon-S (generic brand is Trifectant) are very effective premise preparations since both are more effective on soil. For regular use around birds and cleaning out waterers and feeders, I use Oxine AH.
     
  9. caliclucker

    caliclucker Out Of The Brooder

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    Can I find those disinfectants at Tractor Supply?
     

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