disposal of chicken pooh & shavings??

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by fairladi_chick, Feb 27, 2009.

  1. fairladi_chick

    fairladi_chick Out Of The Brooder

    69
    0
    39
    Oct 4, 2008
    gray court,sc
    what is?should be the best way to disposae of the shavings & pooh after cleaning of pen/coop/brooder/etc.?

    we had been taken the shavings to the dump & now that winter was here & about over,, we have been putting them in the garden.

    will this affect the growth of our new crop of veggies this yr?

    just got new chicks,, can the shaving & food/pooh be eatin from dogs,, is coccidioosis,, with the dogs eating it????
     
  2. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

    10,684
    104
    321
    May 13, 2008
    You should compost them before you apply them to the garden, it will be to hot ( to high in Nitro & ammonia ).

    AL
     
  3. fairladi_chick

    fairladi_chick Out Of The Brooder

    69
    0
    39
    Oct 4, 2008
    gray court,sc
    what if you put them in the garden a couple months before you till & add fertilizer,, & let the pooh & shavings sit there for a couple of months?
     
  4. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

    10,684
    104
    321
    May 13, 2008
    Quote:Do not add additional fertilzer also. Ok here is a good way to help you out of trouble. take a big burlap sack fill it with chicken doody, submerse it in some water for about 2 wks, and use the water to feed your garden, it will not be to hot then and will not burn your plants, this is called tea bag method. the leftover poor from the bag can then be used to lightly!! lightly top dress your rows.

    Do not apply this to plants that do not like or need alot of nitrogen, if you do you will get too much leafy top growth and no blossoms or fruit. Apply your raw compost only in the winter to the garden so it can rest for several months. Just remember to go slow with this as too much will ruin all your hard work.

    AL
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2009
  5. nzpouter

    nzpouter Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,228
    63
    233
    Jan 19, 2009
    new zealand
    in warmer months you can, dug it in and apply lime. Great for leavy vegies like lettuce and cabbages.

    We spread ours thinly over the garden beds.
     
  6. oparea

    oparea Out Of The Brooder

    74
    0
    29
    Sep 12, 2008
    Saint Marys, GA
    Also works great for growing beans and corn.
     
  7. Akane

    Akane Overrun With Chickens

    4,654
    31
    251
    Jun 15, 2008
    If your only applying a small amount you won't have a problem. Straight manure of any animal will burn plants if you apply too much and some manure is "hotter" than others. Chicken manure ranks as hot and should be tilled in well in small amounts or composted first.

    What else are you adding for fertilizer? Chemical fertilizer mixes actually deplete the soil over time. Any other manure should be well composted. I've planted into straight cow manure compost with great results but it was very strongly composted to the point it looked like black soil.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2009
  8. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

    10,684
    104
    321
    May 13, 2008
    Quote:Very well put, this is what I do, it is so much more beneficial this way and much safer. Since I have chickens and access to a endless supply of cow pies, I don't buy fertilizer of any kind anymore.

    AL
     
  9. redhen

    redhen Kiss My Grits... Premium Member

    35,112
    128
    458
    May 19, 2008
    Western MA
    can you burn them??
     
  10. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

    10,684
    104
    321
    May 13, 2008
    Quote:Burn what RH ??.

    AL
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by