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Disposing of un hatched eggs

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by ashleynicole, Apr 14, 2016.

  1. ashleynicole

    ashleynicole Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was just wondering how everyone disposes of un-hatched eggs that didn't make it in the incubator?
     
  2. BertandMary

    BertandMary Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Zip lock bag and goes with the trash ASAP.
     
  3. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    I usually do eggtopsies and when I'm done dispose of the contents out in the brush. If it's really early quitters w/no embryo development or clears, I just toss them.
     
  4. ashleynicole

    ashleynicole Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks guys can you tell what the problem was by eggtopsies? What am I looking for?
     
  5. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    It depends how far along they are. Early on it can help to pinpoint when they quit. Which would be useful if you had a temp spike or something like that happen you can verify the reason. You can spot bacteria infection too. In my opinion eggtopsies are most valuable if you have an awful hatch with the percentage of them not hatching. It can point to problems such as high/low humidity, high/low temps that you can adjust for in following hatches. If you have a great hatch and a couple that didn't make it, it's not really as useful. Of course eggtopsies can leave you with more unanswered questions too.

    Chicks that are fully formed correctly positioned but failed to pip (at least externally) and are very wet usually point to high humidity during the incubation process not allowing proper moisture loss from the egg. On the other hand a fully formed chick that has been pulled down tight in the egg by a leathery membrane will point to too low humidity during incubation resulting in a shrink wrapped chick.

    Eggs that were viable at lockdown but never hatch and are eggtopsied to reveal a chick at the development stage of day 13-17 would signify temps that were slightly too low during the incubation.

    Of course deformities or obvious leg problems will be an easy answer to the why of death, but not as easy to answer the why of the deformity. Could be any number of things from improper storage/turning/temperature/breeding stock and/or nutrition.

    And I just remembered I have this saved...lol http://msucares.com/poultry/reproductions/trouble.html which is a troubleshooting page.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. ashleynicole

    ashleynicole Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Great info thanks so much!
     

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