Distressed Hen... maybe egg yolk peritonitis?

fatimastic

Songster
Aug 26, 2020
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🤔 It could be possible but I’m not sure if that’s what would be causing her symptoms. Do you have access to a local avian vet anywhere nearby where you live?
I think you're spot on guessing this is EYP right down to the swelling of the abdomen. Unfortunately, only an avian vet might be able to help her, as @MamaSug suggested.
How much I wished I was wrong...

Sadly we do not have any avian here. Not a proper one at least..
They claim that they can treat them, but my rooster ended up loosing his eye. I am not taking a chance here. What should I do?

I believe her vent isn't that dirty and her droppings were solid. Do you think she wants to lay but is now unable to?
 

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azygous

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One way to address the suspicion that she is trying to lay an egg is to give calcium which can stimulate contractions if there is a stubborn egg. It's harmless, can't hurt anything, and if there is an egg, may help to resolve it. This is the type of calcium I use because it's fast acting and easy to digest. Give one whole tablet directly into her beak once a day until the problem resolves.
F57D4B6B-216D-49EC-A92C-3DFAF3C5915E.jpeg
 

fatimastic

Songster
Aug 26, 2020
361
143
131
Pakistan
One way to address the suspicion that she is trying to lay an egg is to give calcium which can stimulate contractions if there is a stubborn egg. It's harmless, can't hurt anything, and if there is an egg, may help to resolve it. This is the type of calcium I use because it's fast acting and easy to digest. Give one whole tablet directly into her beak once a day until the problem resolves. View attachment 2922214
We don't have that supplement here. Is it for humans? Can you please send the picture of the composotion so that I can buy one similar to it?

We do have these 2 calcium tablets at home currently.
 

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azygous

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Those calcium supplements are both calcium gluconate, the least effective of the three forms of calcium. But go ahead and use it for now.

There are three different sources of calcium, all different, all digested and absorbed at varying rates of effectiveness. The most common source is calcium carbonate. This is what egg shells, oyster shell, and calcite derived calcium supplements are. It's the highest in calcium, but it's the most difficult to digest and absorb. Some hens absorb it so slowly and inefficiently that it's not able to adequately supply their shell gland. So, they often produce shell-less eggs or very thin shell eggs.

The second kind of calcium is calcium gluconate. It comes from fruits and vegetables. It's not very high in calcium and still hard to digest and absorb.

The third kind of calcium is calcium citrate. It's the by-product of the manufacturing process of making citric acid. This form of calcium is very easy to digest and absorb. For this reason, it works much, much faster than the other two types of calcium. This is the form of calcium that's best to use when a hen is having reproductive issues from the relatively minor one of shell quality to the most serious and life threatening one of egg binding.

One calcium citrate tablet with vitamin D given right into the beak once a day until the issue is resolved is what I strongly recommend. Here's what to buy.

Calcium citrate is not meant for daily use as a calcium source, only a temporary intense calcium boost in a reproductive crisis. Good quality oyster shell is still the very best source of calcium you can provide for laying hens. But be sure they're getting the large oyster shell particles and not the powdery residue left in the bottom of the container as it runs through a hens system much too fast to be properly absorbed. The larger particles remain much longer in the digestive tract allowing for much greater absorption. This will help to assure your hen is keeping her calcium stores topped off and will have less tendency to have egg issues.
 

fatimastic

Songster
Aug 26, 2020
361
143
131
Pakistan
Those calcium supplements are both calcium gluconate, the least effective of the three forms of calcium. But go ahead and use it for now.

There are three different sources of calcium, all different, all digested and absorbed at varying rates of effectiveness. The most common source is calcium carbonate. This is what egg shells, oyster shell, and calcite derived calcium supplements are. It's the highest in calcium, but it's the most difficult to digest and absorb. Some hens absorb it so slowly and inefficiently that it's not able to adequately supply their shell gland. So, they often produce shell-less eggs or very thin shell eggs.

The second kind of calcium is calcium gluconate. It comes from fruits and vegetables. It's not very high in calcium and still hard to digest and absorb.

The third kind of calcium is calcium citrate. It's the by-product of the manufacturing process of making citric acid. This form of calcium is very easy to digest and absorb. For this reason, it works much, much faster than the other two types of calcium. This is the form of calcium that's best to use when a hen is having reproductive issues from the relatively minor one of shell quality to the most serious and life threatening one of egg binding.

One calcium citrate tablet with vitamin D given right into the beak once a day until the issue is resolved is what I strongly recommend. Here's what to buy.

Calcium citrate is not meant for daily use as a calcium source, only a temporary intense calcium boost in a reproductive crisis. Good quality oyster shell is still the very best source of calcium you can provide for laying hens. But be sure they're getting the large oyster shell particles and not the powdery residue left in the bottom of the container as it runs through a hens system much too fast to be properly absorbed. The larger particles remain much longer in the digestive tract allowing for much greater absorption. This will help to assure your hen is keeping her calcium stores topped off and will have less tendency to have egg issues.
I do provide them with egg shells all the times. They are placed in each of their egg box.

For how many days should I give her Calcium Citrate?

Thank you for such important knowledge 🥰
 

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