DNA sexing for chickens

deedletree

In the Brooder
9 Years
Jul 8, 2010
50
0
31
San Mateo
Hi BYC folks,

I'm a chicken-obsessed mom, living in an area where I can't have roosters. Before I moved to California, I was a laboratory manager at a molecular genetics lab. Having lived through the less-than-fun experience of raising a baby who turned out to be a boy, I have decided to offer a DNA sexing service for folks like myself.
 
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Habibs Hens

Cream Legbar Keeper
7 Years
Mar 31, 2012
3,084
129
213
London, UK
My Coop
My Coop
its a nice idea for birds but I think just for chicken that s bit expensive per bird

geese and duck maybe more feasible to pay that but chicken im sceptical
 

fancyfowl4ever

Songster
11 Years
Mar 17, 2008
1,283
26
181
Cranbrook, BC, Canada
we usually only use that for parrots etc.

Here it costs $35 per bird and takes about 3 weeks to get the results, by that time you would be attached to a chick already and may even have an idea of its gender due to its appearance.
They should use this on those hard to sex silkies sometimes maybe but I think its a waste on anything else.
 

deedletree

In the Brooder
9 Years
Jul 8, 2010
50
0
31
San Mateo
Hi Brahmabreeder,

The PCR method I'm using has been used for avian sexing of all sorts of species of birds by research scientists, and is very close to 100% accurate.

Essentially, the sexing will be as accurate as the samples I get. As long as I get feathers (or egg membrane or blood) from the right bird, I should be able to tell you its sex.

Thanks for asking!

Angie
 

deedletree

In the Brooder
9 Years
Jul 8, 2010
50
0
31
San Mateo
In response to the other questions:

Marlene2012, I transmit the results via e-mail as soon as I'm certain I know the sex. This is usually in less than a week.

Afterward I send a little "Certificate of Gender", via mail.

Fancyfowl4ever, my goal is to make my service both quick and inexpensive, specifically with backyard chicken owners in mind.
 

JFTaylor

Hatching
6 Years
I have backyard chickens in the suburbs so roosters are a definite no-no. I remember feeling DAILY anxiety waiting to see if any of my girls started to crow when they were pullets. I ended up having to re-home two roosters which proved troubling to my 4 yr old daughter, and cost me time and travel as I scrambled to make sure the roosters went to a good place. I think the cost outweighs the emotional turmoil some of us feel during this stage! The sooner you know what you have the sooner you can prepare and manage. I do plan to add to my flock in the future and plan to use the service at this website.
http://www.chickgenes.com/
 

Marlene2012

In the Brooder
7 Years
May 27, 2012
26
0
21
Totally agree, a bit costly and 3 weeks does seem like a long time. It would be great if it would show what type of chicken
it was, by the DNA. That could be a fun project for the 4-H kids, using a mixed breed chicken or roo.
 

deedletree

In the Brooder
9 Years
Jul 8, 2010
50
0
31
San Mateo
You're right, three weeks would be a long time, and not timely when considering chickens.

My service, however, is geared specifically toward chickens, so will not take three weeks.

I like your idea about 4-H.
 

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