Do Any of You Believe This?

Discussion in 'Quail' started by loopy119, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. loopy119

    loopy119 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 19, 2009
    Dayton, TX
  2. JJMR794

    JJMR794 Overrun With Chickens

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    That Is Absolutely True. There Are Folks Around Here Who Raise Quail For Edible Eggs Due To Allergy And Disease Related Interactions Associated With Chicken Eggs
     
  3. clintwilson59

    clintwilson59 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Next time I go to the movies I'll bring a bucket of raw quail eggs instead of popcorn, and maybe crack one of those cholesterol free americana eggs on top as a butter substitute.

    Some of that makes sense though, you are supposed to feed quail real high protein, so I'm sure their eggs would be full of it.
     
  4. JJMR794

    JJMR794 Overrun With Chickens

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    EGGS ARE HIGHER IN PROTIEN AND VARIOUS NUTRIENTS, PARTIALLY BECAUSE OF BIRDS DIETARY INTAKE AND PARTIALLY BECAUSE THE BIRDS THEMSELVES ARE DIFFERENT... GAMEBIRDS ARE MUCH BETTER AT PROCESSING CONSUMED FEEDS FOR NUTRIENTS THAN CHICKENS. THEY ALSO REQUIRE A MUCH HIGHER INTAKE OF PROTIEN AND FULL SPECTRUM B VITAMINS. DO I THINK THEY ARE A CURE-ALL? EH, NO. BUT THEY ARE CERTAINLY DIFFERENT IN THEIR NUTRITIONAL OFFERINGS AND FROM ALL MEDICAL LITERATURE ALLEGEDLY HYPOALLERGENIC. ( GIVEN THAT YOU HAVE TO BE EXPOSED TO SOMETHING BEFORE YOU CAN BUILD AN ALLERGY TO IT THAT MAY JUST BE LACK OF EXPOSURE EN MASSE? )
     
  5. loopy119

    loopy119 Out Of The Brooder

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    Hmmm... I just know they taste good when I pickle them. Haha! I also made some pretty good quiche with them! Spinach, and mushrooms, and onions, oh my! I made mini ones and froze them. [​IMG] The nutritional differences make sense to me, like you said, they are different animals than chickens.
     
  6. jfulcher

    jfulcher Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 24, 2011
    Tucson, AZ 85712
    WOW! That is really cool!!
     
  7. joe125

    joe125 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 20, 2010
    If one is allergic to eggs, then there may not be any egg that you can eat!
    There are all the cholesterol freaks around that say this egg is better than that egg....Usually because they are selling a specific eggs. Also, very ignorant people think that cholesterol in any form is bad....NEWS FLASH! The average human needs cholesterol. It's a common nutrient, and if you wish to include a few eggs of any kind in your diet, then you may want to lay off the 10 pounds of white bread, 4 sticks of butter, and the iceberg lettuce salad, smothered in a half pound of Ranch dressing!

    Eat smart!
     
  8. MobyQuail

    MobyQuail c. giganticus

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    I believe anything you raise and feed will be better for you provided you are conscious of what you feed.
    Most of us spoil our feathered friends.

    Important to remember we are talking equal parts here when we compare... you need equal mass/grams of eggs, quail or chicken, to compare, that would be 1 chicken egg or several Quail eggs. Quail egg serving is ~9 grams, if you look it up.

    Quail- http://fatsecret.com/calories-nutrition/usda/quail-egg

    Serving
    Size 1 egg

    Amount Per Serving
    Calories from Fat 9
    Calories 14

    % Daily Values*
    Total Fat 1g 2%
    Saturated Fat 0.32g 2%
    Polyunsaturated Fat 0.119g
    Monounsaturated Fat 0.389g
    Cholesterol 76mg 25%
    Sodium 13mg 1%
    Potassium 12mg
    Total Carbohydrate 0.04g 0%
    Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
    Sugars 0.04g
    Protein 1.17g


    Chicken- http://fatsecret.com/calories-nutrition/generic/egg-whole-raw

    Serving
    Size 1 large

    Amount Per Serving
    Calories from Fat 45
    Calories 74

    % Daily Values*
    Total Fat 4.97g 8%
    Saturated Fat 1.55g 8%
    Polyunsaturated Fat 0.682g
    Monounsaturated Fat 1.905g
    Cholesterol 212mg 71%
    Sodium 70mg 3%
    Potassium 67mg
    Total Carbohydrate 0.38g 0%
    Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
    Sugars 0.38g
    Protein 6.29g


    [​IMG]

    I like my Quail egg salad...

    [​IMG]
     
  9. chrishel

    chrishel Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've substituted quail eggs (1/4 cup of quail eggs, 7 eggs, for one large chicken egg) in baking when I've run out of chicken eggs. They are richer and the cake came out much more dense and moist.

    I don't really believe all of what was said in that article. As JJ said, no one has reported allergies to quail eggs, but how many people have actually eaten a quail egg? Versus how many people have eaten chicken eggs and have documented allergies?

    Feed plays a big role in the egg's content. In mass produced chicken eggs, I would think the egg content is much poorer than a home raised chicken that gets to free range on grass and bugs over a large area. Commercial free ranged chickens are just raised too dense for the area to get as much benefit as home raised. Also, there's those eggs that are marketed with added nutrients. They just add them to the chicken feed.

    I was just recently officially diagnosed with an egg allergy. I've had a hunch that I've been allergic to eggs but ignored it for 35+ years! Basically, cooked or eggs used in baking are fine. I just don't eat them runny or raw. Or have more than 2 at a time. I do have Eggs Benedict once in a while (yum!) and deal with the consequences. It's so worth it.

    Too much of anything is a bad thing. My husband sees kids who drink too much milk and get anemic (the calcium starts affecting iron uptake). Parents who cut out all fat in their kids foods and affect their development (fat is needed for brain development and kids are growing!).

    I always thought that eggs were the "perfect" food since they contain all the different amino acids. I haven't check that out, but they are the "perfect" food for chicks!
     
  10. MobyQuail

    MobyQuail c. giganticus

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    http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=42


    Food scientists have also identified the egg yolk as one of the most dense sources of biotin in the diet.

    One of the least well-known of the B-complex vitamins, biotin was originally referred to as "vitamin H." Biotin was discovered in late 1930s and early 1940s research when chicks fed diets high in raw egg white consistently developed skin rashes and lost the hair around their eyes. When egg yolk was added to the chicks' diet, these symptoms disappeared.

    Today, we know why. Researchers have identified a substance in raw egg white - a sugar and protein-containing molecule (glycoprotein) called avidin - that can bind together with biotin and prevent its absorption.
     

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