Do bucks/goat ever stop eating?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by arabianequine, Jun 26, 2011.

  1. arabianequine

    arabianequine Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 4, 2010
    He would eat himself sick if I let him.

    I give him usually a small flake of hay am and pm. Sometimes weeds every other day or so and maybe a bit more hay some days. He is good weight. I will try and get a recent pic on here of him.

    He is a saanen and about 1 1/2 years old. Here is an older pic from a month or so ago. This was not long after I got him. I washed him up and sprayed his skin issues with blue kote. I really like this pic lol.

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    This is what he looked like when I got him.

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    Last edited: Jun 26, 2011
  2. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Opelousas, Louisiana
    He is handsome!!!!!!!!!!! Very good looking. The buck that I have knows when to stop. There is always leftovers in his feeder.
     
  3. Hot2Pot

    Hot2Pot Fox Hollow Rabbitry

    Feb 1, 2010
    West TN
    Goats can eat themselves to death, it is termed overeating disease. If they do not get sufficient greens, they can go crazy eating grain and die from bloat or other issues. Keep your grain secure. Good goat favorites include almost any type of tree leaves, kudzu, and weeds. The more they get of that , the less likely they are to overeat. Hope this helps. If a goat is not interested in eating, it is sick. Browsers live to eat.
     
  4. arabianequine

    arabianequine Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 4, 2010
    Quote:I don't have any grain here whatsoever at the moment and I have not for a good while now. What is kudzu? He came here a good weight and still is.
     
  5. arabianequine

    arabianequine Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 4, 2010
    Quote:Thank you, he is my favorite goat here. He does stop, it just seems he is always ready for more lol.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2011
  6. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Quote:[​IMG]

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  7. 9gerianMile

    9gerianMile Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 18, 2010
    Western MT
    My buck is a total fatty in the belly department, and his son is his spitting image. I have a new buckling, and he is much leaner and more "dairy" for sure. I do not grain my bucks often, but they free graze pasture, and boy do they take advantage. I don't worry about them because they are healthy otherwise. If that changes- they may go on a diet.
     
  8. glenolam

    glenolam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Canterbury, CT
    He's just fine and very handsome! As long as you've given him his CD&T he's probably just more of a browser than 2 meals a day type goat.

    FWIW, I don't feed much grain, if any at all, to all of my goats during the warm summer months. They really don't need grain to live, just good hay or browse and water. Grain is more of a supplemental feed and helps put weight on and give other nutrients or minerals that they may not be getting from the hay you're giving (although loose minerals will help with that end anyway).
     
  9. arabianequine

    arabianequine Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 4, 2010
    Quote:Thank you! He has not had the CDT this year yet. I will be giving him it very soon though hopefully this week. Would he eat like that with out it? Why does that effect his eating?

    Yeah I have not had no grain here since the girls got sick and they have the loose minerals.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2011
  10. elevan

    elevan Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

    Quote:Thank you! He has not had the CDT this year yet. I will be giving him it very soon though hopefully this week. Would he eat like that with out it? Why does that effect his eating?

    Yeah I have not had no grain here since the girls got sick and they have the loose minerals.

    CD/T vaccination doesn't affect their eating...it helps prevent problems from their overeating.
     

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