DO I HAVE A ROOSTER? (PICS ADDED)

irf1983

Songster
10 Years
May 7, 2009
252
3
131
Brooksville, FL
I've suspected one of our young "hens" is actually a roo. Although it has no spurs, and a small comb and wattles. Some of my known hens have larger combs than it. And I thought all roosters had spurs. It's around 4 months old I think. My wife called this morning and said she heard crowing coming from the run. Do hens ever crow like a rooster? And if it is a rooster, do I need to keep it separate from the hens if I want to eat the eggs? Thanks!
 
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Opa

Opa-wan Chickenobi
12 Years
May 11, 2008
9,573
467
336
Howell Michigan
Pictures would help people on this site advise you on the sex of your bird. Spurs don't usually start to show until the bird is much older and then the spurs continue to grow as the rooster ages. Sometimes a hen will assume the dominate role in a flock and mimic rooster behaviors including crowing but the crow won't be very loud and won't sound quite right. Having a rooster in your flock is for the purpose of having fertile eggs for hatching. He is not necessary for egg production. Fertile eggs are completely edible and doesn't affect the look or taste.
 

Schultz

CluckN'Crow Farm
11 Years
Aug 5, 2008
3,837
27
221
Indianapolis
I agree roo and a handsome one. Something to keep in mind is that roos usually don't start getting spurs until later on. Even hens can have small spurs!
 

Chicks_N_Horses

Songster
10 Years
Mar 30, 2009
2,722
9
191
South Alabama
LOL Only if you want too....We eat fertile eggs - ones from hens with roosters. It is basically exactly like eating one from hens with no roos.
Some don't like the thought though....

Now you can get an incubator and join us in hatching out chicks which is SOOOooooo fun!
 

Wynette

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Sep 25, 2007
25,574
220
421
Michigan
Nice little EE roo! His comb's not that big because EEs typically have pea combs, which do not get that large.

I hope you can keep him around - it's not just for fertilized eggs that they are good for - they're also awesome protectors of the flock, and...well....it gives the girls something to do!
 

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