Do I have Orloff boys or girls?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by henjoy, Aug 17, 2008.

  1. henjoy

    henjoy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have 7 Spangled Russian Orloffs and I love them, but at 14 weeks I still can't tell what gender they are. Is there a way to tell? In my other chicks of that age, gender is fairly obvious but these kids have me stumped. They all look pretty much the same--no feather difference, no comb difference. Can anyone tell me what to look for? They are great chickens--friendly, gentle and great foragers! I really think everybody should have some. Thanks for any help with this!
     
  2. sgtmom52

    sgtmom52 Birds & Bees

    I have six 17 week old teenagers that are half Russian Orloff (father) and half EE (mother). By 14 weeks the 2 Roosters were crowing (at 5:15 am!) and noticably larger than the 4 pullets. They have also developed nice tail feathers. They still don't have much in the way of combs. I don't know how much they get from their father. They have yellow legs - not the typical green leg of EEs. At 17 weeks the Roos are now larger than my Buff Orps although they are still somewhat afraid of the older hens.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2008
  3. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Post some photos and we can have a look-see and help you determine the sex.
     
  4. fowlafoot

    fowlafoot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a few pics of some young ones, can't remember their hatch date exactly, but they might help

    [​IMG]
    Rooster in front, pullets behind

    [​IMG]
    Pullet
     
  5. henjoy

    henjoy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the info. Those Orloffs are pretty. It looks like the roosters have more feathers on their heads and necks. Am I interpreting the pictures correctly? Some of mine do have more head feathers than others. Are their tails carried differently? I'd post pictures of mine if I had the proper equipment and know how. Thanks to all for the responses and pictures.
     
  6. fowlafoot

    fowlafoot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You have it right. The roosters develop the "cape" at the back of the neck faster and the beard and muffs lead back to it making for a very fluffy head. The hens usually end up with the more impressive beard and muffs as adults but the cape is more impressive in the roosters. Sooner or later they will crow or lay an egg and you'll be 100% sure [​IMG] Good Luck with them, they are amazing chickens.
     

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