do i intervene...or leave it..

Discussion in 'Quail' started by tyniskee, Feb 4, 2013.

  1. tyniskee

    tyniskee Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 22, 2013
    England
    Well, I have a chick trying to hatch...it has been well over 30 hours since the start...
    Usually I leave them to it if they are fighting as much as this guy is...
    The problem is...for about 25 hours the top of the shell has been off of this guy...his body is showing and he is starting to dry and become fluffy....but he can't seem to get free of the shell... Would I be best off removing bits of the shell to help him out?

    Thank you, a fast reply would be amazing!
     
  2. tyniskee

    tyniskee Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 22, 2013
    England
    Well i helped a tiny bit...loosened a few small pieces of shell which i thought were near his head...turns out they were, he'd gotten himself into a bit of a mess, couldn't turn around to chip at it himself...because he was getting so dry.. He's still stuck in the shell , so after half an hour if he's not free i think i'll have to do it...can't have him injuring himself when he dries completely (see on the pic his head and back are getting fluffy... )

    I'm wondering how long is too long to leave him to do this himself.

    He's still really fighting fit and is giving it a good try to get free.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. spikennipper

    spikennipper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Have a look in the shell with a flashlight see what is making him stuck sometimes they need a little help to free themselves it does look like he does need help since he is fluffing out, just make sure there is no blood or his umbilical cord isn't stuck to the shell as pulling this will make his intestines come out, chip a bit away at a time, goodluck [​IMG]
     
  4. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    My Coop
    This is always the question, whether or not to help. And that depends on how badly the chick is stuck. Generally this is natures way of weeding out the weak ones as if they do not have the energy to get out of the egg, they may have genetic issues, weak lungs or legs.

    But if he is half way out and starting to dry out, I would go ahead and help him out. But again, he may not be a healthy chick to survive to adulthood. Then again, he may thrive and be the flock leader. You will soon find out. :)
     
  5. animalsrock123

    animalsrock123 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 16, 2013
    Aww hope he makes it. What I would do is watch him, and if he starts getting weaker maybe help him a little. Beleive me, I don't like this rule, but sometimes it's nature's survival of the fittest. If you end up helping him too much he might be weaker than the others. But don't give up hope yet. Good luck and wishing all goes well for you and your chick!
     
  6. chefchick

    chefchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had a quail get stuck during hatching, and he started drying out, which I think made things worse for him/her. I took a damp paper towel, and squeezed just a bit of water into the shell, and then wet the shell membrane some. i tried chipping away some of the shell, too, but it's head was out so i knew it could breathe and I didn't want to interfere too much. It eventually made it out, but it was deformed and the others started playing tug-o-war with it's feet and wings. Quail can be brutal. I ended up having to cull it, but i don't feel bad for trying. There are happy endings too- so I'd say go for it.
     
  7. tyniskee

    tyniskee Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 22, 2013
    England
    Well I helped, he got free...sadly he had a few problems...but he had thought so hard I think I tried every trick in the book but I couldn't do anything to help him.. Poor guy still never gave up but I did for him...ah I hate that. His toes could have been straightened but his legs had no chance. I think if this hadn't have been the case, it's safe to say he was definitely. The strongest out of the ones we have..
     
  8. chefchick

    chefchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am sorry to hear that. i agree- It stinks to have to put them down, but it's part of being a responsible owner. Best wishes to you with the rest of your new babies! Hopefully, I will have a few around the 20th. I set 12 eggs just because I am in baby bird withdrawl. I had to toss two this am when I was turning them because they were cracked, but hopefully I get a few. And some RSL and other mutt chicks on the 23rd :)
     
  9. tyniskee

    tyniskee Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 22, 2013
    England
    Thank you and good luck!!
     
  10. redraindrop

    redraindrop Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 6, 2013
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    I just hatched my first brood and our home made incubators temperature was unreliable(we used a water heater thermostat) and they were to warm apparently because they began to hatch 2 days early. I helped a few out of their shell because I feel if they die later from issues at least they had a chance(I raise them for eggs). One I helped out of its shell had severely curled feet, after trying packing tape which cut into its ankles, I made splints out of the sticky parts of fabric bandaids, but the other chicks attacked it's feet when I put it back in so I separated it with one other chick for company in another box. He was stressed and tipping head first for about an hour but after a few he began to get his balance. When I removed the bandaids it's little feet turned red and obviously hurt so I dipped them in cold water on and off for about an hour until the red went away, left it and the other chick separated for another day and half to heal before returning it, but it was worth the torment to fix it because its walking like a normal chick now and having no problem blending in with the others.
     

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