Do little hens-to-be act this way!?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Hens4Fun, Nov 20, 2009.

  1. Hens4Fun

    Hens4Fun Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 18, 2009
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    I know I will ultimately have to wait probably, but anxious because I live in the city and roosters sadly are not welcome...and both were supposed to be sexed [​IMG] My first nine hens never acted THIS way...certainly not at 5-6 weeks which is the age of these chicks.

    These two square off all the time .... both are bullies ... one a Black Cochin & one an EE
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    HEAD SHOTS:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Too young to tell? Is the behavior appropriate for pecking order? Or do I have potentially have two cockerels on my hands [​IMG]
     
  2. Goose and Fig

    Goose and Fig Grateful Geese

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    Their legs look roo-ish, but the combs sure don't. Girls will play fight too, just not as often. I'd give them more time. What cute action pics!
     
  3. Buff Hooligans

    Buff Hooligans Scrambled

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    That's a great action shot! I bet they settle the hierarchy issues sometime soon though... Don't worry.
     
  4. flakey chick

    flakey chick Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 3, 2007
    Florida
    The EE has very thick legs which make me think roo. I can't tell how thick under the feathers on the other one.
     
  5. Hens4Fun

    Hens4Fun Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hope it IS hierachy issues [​IMG]

    And yes ... the EE has very thick legs. I have two others I got the same day. In the beginning I thought this one to be a runt, smaller, slower to feather, not as active .....then, boom, it is now bigger than the other two EEs and it's head bigger than the chicks that were a week or so older but different varieties (incidentally, even when it was the smallest in the brooder it had attitude and picked on the bigger chicks [​IMG] ). The black cochin has legs similar to my white, which I'm hoping is the pretty girl I want it to be. Sigh... what will be will be, but I hate to lose chicks I have grown attached too [​IMG]
     
  6. Year of the Rooster

    Year of the Rooster Sebright Savvy

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    The dark one is a rooster. You can tell by his feathering. He has bald spots on his shoulders and other parts of his body. Roosters' feathers don't grow in as fast as a hen's.
     
  7. Hens4Fun

    Hens4Fun Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] well, shooooot .... that explains why the white cochin is almost two weeks ahead on feathering out. Sighhhhhhh I had wondered why the black one was so slow to feather.
     
  8. I dunno. I have had a few black chicken hens fight in adult hood. I think one is an australorp and the other a NJG.

    I see them fighting every so often. Who know what for, but there ya have it.
     
  9. Year of the Rooster

    Year of the Rooster Sebright Savvy

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    Quote:But yours are ADULTS. There is a major age difference between the OP's and yours. Not to mention the breeds. The OP's bird is a Dark Brahma from the looks of it. The roosters of that breed are slow growers.
     
  10. Hens4Fun

    Hens4Fun Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] well now I am more confused. So you think one is not an EE, eh? I looked at some pictures and I'm guessing you think this one may be a Dark Brahma
    [​IMG]

    Would that explain why it is suddenly bigger than the other two "EE's" I thought it was related too? It does have different coloring (they are more brown), and is a good bit bigger now than the other two. Do I have hope of it being a bossy female?[​IMG] Any other guesses or opinions out there [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2009

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