Do my home-grown eggs have Salmonella?

Discussion in 'Chicken Breeders & Hatcheries' started by blondiebee181, Oct 7, 2012.

  1. blondiebee181

    blondiebee181 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hey, curiosity question:

    With baking season coming, and the possibility of making things that request raw eggs....if I have 5 backyard chickens that have never shown signs of being sick do their eggs still carry Salmonella? I always heard Salmonella was a store-bought egg thing...does this mean my backyard hen eggs are okay? Or is there still a risk and I should stick with only cooking them?
     
  2. crankster76

    crankster76 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    as with any chicken or byproduct there is always at least a trace. should always cook .
     
  3. blondiebee181

    blondiebee181 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mkay...does it tend to be more or less prevalent in a small-time backyard flock as opposed to a large one? Just curious....also when you say you have "Dots and Giants" do you mean Jersey Giants and Wyandottes?
     
  4. hillbillyfarmer

    hillbillyfarmer Out Of The Brooder

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    There is a way to pasteurize eggs, just Google pasteurizing eggs. I personally have not tryed to pasteurize eggs so how well it works I don't know. I just use fresh clean eggs that have not been soiled by chicken poo when a recipe calls for raw eggs and have not gotten sick from it, so use your own judgment if you decide to do so. If you try to pasteurize your eggs let us know how it turns out.
     
  5. blondiebee181

    blondiebee181 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have pasturized eggs before...you mix them with sugar, place them in a metal bowl and float the bowl in a boiling water bath until a thermometer reads....I forget the exact temp....but you have to stir it almost constantly...it was for Tiramisu...
     
  6. mychickenbrood

    mychickenbrood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I do not know if Samonela is more prevanent in home flocks, but safety should always be taken. Cook the eggs well (baking will do this) and do not wash the egg before using it, as this washes off the protective film that helps keep bacteria out. I do not use any really dirty eggs, but for lightly soiled you can let dry, then use a fine mess material and "sand off" the debris. Also, hatcheries often sell a fine sand paper like material for this purpose. I have never bought it, so know nothing about it.

    Good luck with your eggs and baking. I wouldn't worry.
     
  7. mychickenbrood

    mychickenbrood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    One more thing. I know I am stating the obvious, but I had to tell my husband this; wash hands after cracking open raw eggs with soap and water. Just sayin all...
     
  8. Syerf

    Syerf Out Of The Brooder

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    With the exception of strains like salmonella pullorum, chickens do not show signs of salmonella infection. So unless you have lab tests done you can't really know ahead of time weather or not your chickens/eggs have anything.

    As far as store bought eggs go, if the CFIA or FDA find a farm, hatchery, grading station etc. operating in the eating egg chain with salmonella they will shut it down. But the key word is IF, as outbreaks of foodborne bacteria have tought us. 99% of the time store bought eggs are safe if you prefer your eggs runny, just remember that it still isn't in the same level of certainty as death and taxes.

    Lastly I must confess, the only reason I wash my hands is to get the egg white off when I crack them open!
     
  9. blondiebee181

    blondiebee181 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks all :)
     

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