Do onions cause anemia in chickens

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chick n goat ma, Jul 27, 2014.

  1. chick n goat ma

    chick n goat ma Out Of The Brooder

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    I have been adding some chopped onions to my chickens pellet feed, (also finely chopped/grated carrots potato bell pepper lettuce meat and a little suet... et al) I was told to stop giving them onions because 1) it makes the eggs taste gamey 2) it causes anemia.
    my chickens are only 16 weeks old and haven't laid any eggs yet. They look very healthy and are lively. I don't want to feed them anything that could harm them.
     
  2. Mountain Peeps

    Mountain Peeps Change is inevitable, like the seasons Premium Member

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    Chickens can't eat lots of onions as this can cause anemia. But, small amounts is fine to feed.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2014
  3. N F C

    N F C doo be doo be doo Premium Member Project Manager

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    I go by the treats chart at this link for what's ok/what's not but unless I overlooked it, onions don't seem to be listed. Making the eggs taste funny would be enough of a reason for me to abstain even if they aren't toxic. Guess I'd go by the reasoning of "better safe than sorry" and not take a chance on harming them.

    Here's a quote from the bottom of the chart, "Do not count on your chickens "knowing" what is bad for them...also do not count on these "toxic" plants immediately being identifiable by finding a dead bird the next morning...usually it is a slow process damaging organs , inhibiting the ability of your bird to utilize the nutrients in their feed, etc."

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/chicken-treat-chart-the-best-treats-for-backyard-chickens
     
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    I don't feed onions to my birds or mammals.

    -Kathy
     
  5. N F C

    N F C doo be doo be doo Premium Member Project Manager

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    I have to back track on my post re: the treats chart and not seeing information about onions.

    There is a link at the bottom to a listing of toxic plants and their effects that does include onions. Here's the link to the toxic plant list:
    http://www.poultryhelp.com/toxicplants.html

    and here is the quote on onions:

    "ONION (Allium cepa); bulbs, bulblets, flowers, stems; gastrointestinal tract affected by plant toxins; plant also causes dermatitis."

    I'm off to do more reading about other plants. This stuff is important to know!
     
  6. chick n goat ma

    chick n goat ma Out Of The Brooder

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    NorthFLChick That is the best advice I have received so far, Thankyou so much for pointing me in the right direction 'Chicken Treat Chart' tells me everything I need to know about chicken nutrition, In future I will only feed my pets what is listed there as good for them.
    best wishes from a north central Fl grandma
     
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  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    Below is from:
    http://birds.about.com/od/feeding/tp/poisonousfoods.htm

    1. Chocolate

    Chocolate is a wonderful treat to share with human family members, but it can be harmful or fatal to your pet bird. Chocolate poisoning first affects a bird's digestive system, causing vomiting and diarrhea. As the condition progresses, the bird's central nervous system is affected, first causing seizures and eventually death.

    2. Apple Seeds

    Believe it or not, apples - along with other members of the rose family including cherries, peaches, apricots, and pears - contain trace amounts of Cyanide within their seeds. While the fruit of the apple is fine for your bird, be aware that in addition to the poisonous seeds, there may be pesticides present on the fruit's skin. Be sure to thoroughly cleanse and core any apple pieces that you share with your bird to avoid exposure to these toxins.


    3. Avocado


    The skin and pit of this popular fruit had been known to cause cardiac distress and eventual heart failure in pet bird species. Although there is some debate to the degree of toxicity of avocados, it is generally advised to adopt a "better safe than sorry" attitude toward them and keep guacomole and other avocado products as far away from pet birds as possible.

    4. Onions

    While the use of limited amounts of onion or garlic powders as flavorings is generally regarded as acceptable, excessive consumption of onions causes vomiting, diarrhea, and a host of other digestive problems. It has been found that prolonged exposure can lead to a blood condition called hemolytic anemia, which is followed by respiratory distress and eventual death.

    5. Alcohol

    Although responsible bird owners would never dream of offering their pet an alcoholic drink, there have been instances in which free roaming birds have attained alcohol poisoning through helping themselves to unattended cocktails. Alcohol depresses the organ systems of birds and can be fatal. Make sure that your bird stays safe by securing him in his cage whenever alcohol is served in your home.

    6. Mushrooms

    Mushrooms are a type of fungus, and have been known to cause digestive upset in companion birds. Caps and stems of some varieties can induce liver failure.


    7. Tomato Leaves


    Tomatoes, like potatoes and other nightshades, have a tasty fruit that is fine when used as a treat for your bird. The stems, vines, and leaves, however, are highly toxic to your pet. Make sure that any time you offer your bird a tomato treat it has been properly cleaned and sliced, with the green parts removed, so that your bird will avoid exposure to any toxins.


    8. Salt


    While all living beings need regulated amounts of sodium in their systems, too much salt can lead to a host of health problems in birds, including excessive thirst, dehydration, kidney dysfunction, and death. Be sure to keep watch over the amount of salty foods your bird consumes.


    9. Caffiene


    Caffinated beverages such as soda, coffee, and tea are popular among people - but allowing your bird to indulge in these drinks can be extremely hazardous. Caffeine causes cardiac malfunction in birds, and is associated with increased heartbeat, arrhythmia, hyperactivity, and cardiac arrest. Share a healthy drink of pure fruit or vegetable juice with your bird instead - this will satisfy both your bird's tastebuds and nutritional requirements.


    10. Dried Beans


    Cooked beans are a favorite treat of many birds, but raw, dry bean mixes can be extremely harmful to your pet. Uncooked beans contain a poison called hemaglutin which is very toxic to birds. To avoid exposure, make sure to thoroughly cook any beans that you choose to share with your bird.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2014
  8. SavageDestiny

    SavageDestiny Chillin' With My Peeps

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    And the thing is that, as the link mentions, the effects build over time. Small amounts on a regular basis can and will cause problems.
     
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  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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  10. chick n goat ma

    chick n goat ma Out Of The Brooder

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    I sincerely hope I have not harmed my chookies, I would hate myself if I killed or damaged them in any way them Like loving them to death with love.[​IMG] Now I am aware of the 'Treats for Chickens' page I will stick to what is listed there as good for them..
     

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