Do you consider your chickens a farm animal or a pet?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by duluthralphie, Sep 4, 2014.

  1. duluthralphie

    duluthralphie Chicken Wrangler Premium Member

    I am curious as to what and how people consider their chickens and why?


    It appears to be several competing view here, there is not a correct answer in my view I am just curious.

    I consider my chickens a commodity or farm animal. They are both a hobby and an investment, I expect a return on, in the form of food, either eggs or meat.

    This does not mean I do not "love" my chickens, It simply means I look at them in a pragmatic way. I find them a good source of healthy food. I grew up on a farm and love animals. That does not stop me from eating them.

    I will feed and care for them and protect them from harm in any manner I can. I know this will make no sense to some.

    BTW the best thing a chicken can do to insure its survival is act cute, friendly and get name.

    I enjoy them like a pet, but I never forget they are no pets....


    What about you? How do you consider your chickens.
     
  2. FrankNLiveOak

    FrankNLiveOak Out Of The Brooder

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    Well, we consider our chickens part of our family and not a commodity, but that doesn't mean we are concerned with cost vs return on our investment.

    We have chickens for meat, eggs, bug control, etc, etc, etc...

    But, it doesn't hurt that our Alpha Rooster, Roscoe, comes over and jumps up in my arms and rides around with me with I go out to feed them and our goats.

    Frank
     
  3. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    I have the same view. My chickens are pets with benefits. The ultimate recycleable pet. My first flock of 5 were all named, I have culled one due to feather picking and not laying, and when the rest are no longer productive, they will go into the soup pot. I spend way too much time enjoying them, but will not spend money on vet bills. If I can't take care of any health issues, culling is the only viable option for me. I got them for insect and weed control, fertilizer, entertainment. Eggs are a side benefit.
     
  4. duluthralphie

    duluthralphie Chicken Wrangler Premium Member

    Thanks.

    I find your views interesting. You both mention insect control, I forgot to mention that, it is a huge reason to keep them and allow them to free range.

    I would not consider mine a part of our family l I do my dogs. BUT I would miss them if I did not have them.
     
  5. ECBW

    ECBW Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Allow me to interject another category: hobby.

    The names of my chickens are... Teriyaki, Curry, Scampi, Marsala, Kong, Pow...
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2014
  6. Bean789

    Bean789 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am new to chicken keeping and we got them for the egg production and pets. I don't think I could cull one of my chickens unless she was suffering terribly. They are just 21 weeks old and have personalities and quirky ways that I find interesting and entertaining. I have grandchildren who live with me and who take part in the daily care of their pets. They have given names to them all. We started with just 8 baby chicks and now have 6 more new babies in the brooder along with 4 guineas. I can't say that the day will not come when it might be necessary to view them as a food source, besides the eggs, but for now....when my 9 yo granddaughter picks up her white Sultan and holds her with love and affection, they are our pets.
     
  7. FrankNLiveOak

    FrankNLiveOak Out Of The Brooder

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    By this time last year we had purchased 6 large bottles of OFF deep woods DEET - we had/have a serious mosquito problem here. Since adding the ducks and letting our chicken flock expand we have purchased none this year and have no insect issues.

    I have read that the number of bugs a chicken/duck can eat is a very small percentage of how many mosquito's are born in a pond/creek/etc (we have both) and that the insect control can not be significant, but I can say from practical experience that we went from being eaten alive if we walked outside to no bites at all this year - with NO changes in weather or rainfall.

    Frank
     
  8. fshinggrl

    fshinggrl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    the edge of insanity
    farm animal
     
  9. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Deer flies: no where near as frequent this year. Mosquitoes: no change. Black flies: almost non existent. But that's been the case for non chicken people also this year. Squash bugs: none. June bugs: much less. Garden: used a lot of fertilizer last year. Corn crop pathetic. This year: used very little fertilizer, just starter when setting transplants. Corn: taller than me with 2 good ears on each plant. Sorghum: planted it just for grins and giggles: 9 feet tall. Just now setting tassels. Lawn: growing like crazy.
     
  10. Den in Penn

    Den in Penn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lawn Ornaments. Farm animal, but you can't really discount anything else they are. Does anyone mention for therapy.
     

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