Do you go to a vet for our chickens health?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Glenda Heywoodo, Feb 4, 2017.

  1. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Glenda Heywood

    Do you go to a vet for our chickens health?
    Are vets hard to find for doctoring chickens?

    Do you take manure samples to vets about your chickens?
    Lets hear from you all about your chickens
     
  2. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Glenda Heywood
    for the bird who has
    any kind of sickness such as
    MAREKS
    AND IS NOT SAVEABLE (this is for the benefit of the flock)
    ALL THE WHILE HE IS SLUFFING OFF DANDER TO THE CHICKENS
    it would be best to take him out of the picture
    Disspossing of the body and keeping the rest of the flock from harm

    Here is a recipe for the good chicken flock health
    do feed the chickens this recipe for wet mash probiotic
    as they will need nervous system help
    these vitamins at strength I quoted are a must for these chickens for two weeks at least

    1 qt of dry crumbles
    1-1/2 qt of milk any kind
    1/2 cup of yoguart
    put 1/2 cup of apple sauce on top of this wet mash when feeding it to the flock

    and for each chicken in flock = put in one 1000 mg of vit E cut end off and add to mix
    and 1 vitamin B complex pill for each chicken
    fed and put it in the wet mix
    mix good

    Glenda L Heywood Cassville Missouri
     
  3. trailrider330

    trailrider330 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last year, I must have called almost 20 vets within a two hours drive of us, only to find that none of them would treat chickens (not even the farm vets or vets that claimed to be aviary vets - guess they only do birds like macaws, cockatiels, etc). I did find one that said they offered gross autopsies on chickens for $100 but they did not offer any care for sick or injured chickens. You would think with all the people with backyard flocks now, there would be vets scrambling to fill that need.
     
  4. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    DO CHICKENS NEED GRIT AND OYSTER SHELL?
    I am asked a lot about using grit and oyster shell for chickens

    yes some chicks will over eat and get a clogged crop
    as the grit will build up in it.
    Chicks do not need oyster shell
    JUST HENS NEED BOTH GRIT AND OYSTER SHELL

    if they were eagerly eating it I probably would have taken the bowl of grit out
    for a while giving their crop time to filter it to the gizzard

    the most used grit is granite grit

    I used mineralized granite grit for pigeons

    as the minerals were good for the chickens and it was red and chickens love any thing red
    so I fed it to my hens

    I never fed chicks grit as I never fed whole or cracked grains
    just fed commercial crumbles to my chicks

    Then when they were adults I always had a feeder of grit as chickens need the grit and minerals
    ALSO A FEEDER FOR OYSTER SHELL AS HENS NEED IT FOR CALCIUM


    here is a article on grit and its use by a friend of mine

    Grit and its use
    Randy Henry cALIFORNIA


    This is an article to dispel the notions that all Grits are alike.
    A lot of grit is desiccated granite, soft stuff, flows through gizzards like sand,
    the cheap stuff, usually just a by product of some other mining enterprise.
    Iodine is one of the toughest items to get in a correct amount, systemically
    yet is necessary for proper immune system development. The red iodized
    granite pigeon grit is all hard granite, infused with a chelated iodide formul
    a that provides better grinding action and releases iodine molecules to bond
    with feed particles.

    Red Iodized Granite Pigeon Grit is selected for particle size and is produced
    solely for the purpose of performing in a bird's gizzard. It out lasts all softer,
    more rotten stone products often sold as grit or in premixed grit formulas.
    Since pigeons feed squabs by regurgitation, a good grit base is provided
    to squab's gizzards even before they fledge.

    I feed my pigeons cafeteria style, that is free choice Whole kernel dried Corn, whole
    kernel Dried hard red Wheat, and whole, dried either Green Peas, commonly called
    wrinkle peas or Lentils. Just FYI, they eat twice as much Corn as Wheat, twice as
    much Wheat as Peas. An early supply of a good grit is imperative for squabs
    to digest the whole grains they are fed by their parents.

    The parents are selective, they only produce pigeon milk for a short time, no grit is
    introduced to the squabs at that time. When the parents are providing the squabs with
    whole grains, they provide them with grit to facilitate digestion. Since many more
    commercial squab producers utilize whole grains, than do other commercial
    avian producers, pigeon breeders have funded the most research re grit formulation.

    The advent of raising squabs on pelleted feed is relatively new while feeding reprocessed
    feed to chickens and waterfowl is dateable to much earlier. It seems to appeal to the birds
    as well, as those I have seen or have butchered all contain a very high percentage of the
    grit from the containers compared to any grit sours they may have picked from. I have a
    lot of grit source, my place once belonged to a roofing company, they dumped small pea
    sized gravel's by the truckload around here over many years. These rocks range from
    white quartz to crushed granite and the birds ingest very little of any of it.
    Randy Henry (JaRaCo)

    Glenda L Heywood Cassville Missouri
     
  5. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Question came on BYC
    New Hen has crusy beak, runny nose, keeps closing eyes - first chicken


    Glenda Heywood posted

    I think you need to get hold of a vet if possible and get something for
    respiratory disease

    such as
    it is surely contagious

    and you must spray your shoes after taking care of them in clorox like put the clorox in a flat tray and step into it

    also do not wear the clothes you do their chores in to take care of them in

    also DO THEIR CHORES LAST

    try and get some neomycin and put it in the water
    and make a wet mash probiotic with the neomycin in it

    1 qt of dry chicken crumbles
    2 qts of water
    in the water put 1 tsp of the neomycin in it
    feed this twice the first day and the 2nd day
    and in the water also

    watch how the others act they may come down with it daily

    generally there is no end to the out come
    it is very stressful and the birds will probably remain carriers even when they get over it

    try and be objective that you will save some of them

    email me with any questions and do seperate all the sickly one

    BUT DO MEDICATE EVERY CHICKEN WITH NEOMYCIN ASAP

    it is the time of yr that the wild birds are stoping by and defecating and the chickens eat that manure and it has the MG or CRD or roup disease germs in it

    also warm days and cold nites bring this on and YES IT IS CATCHINGalso I would get Vetrx and run all the sick birds heads with vetrx and under their wings put vetrx and down the throat 1/2 tsp per day till coughing and sneezing quits
    in the water with the neomycin put 1 tsp of Vetrx to the gallon

    ALSO SOME INFORMATION IS



    Poultry
    Bacterial diseases


    Mycoplasmosis (CRD, Air sac, Sinusitis)
    Organisms in the genus Mycoplasma are a significant cause of respiratory disease in poultry. Of the numerous species of Mycoplasma that have been isolated from domestic poultry, three are of known significance. Mycoplasma gallisepticum is associated with chronic respiratory disease (CRD)/air sac syndrome in chickens and turkeys and infectious sinusitis of turkeys; Mycoplasma meleagridis is associated with airsacculitis in turkeys; and Mycoplasma synoviae is the cause of infectious synovitis in chickens and turkeys.

    Chronic respiratory disease (CRD), air sac syndrome and infectious sinusitis of turkeys have a common cause. CRD was first recognized as a chronic but mild respiratory disease of adult chickens. It reduced egg production but caused little or no mortality. Afterward, a condition known as "air sac disease" became a problem in young birds. It caused high mortality in some flocks. Many birds became stunted, feed efficiency was reduced, and many fowl were rejected as unfit for human consumption when processed.

    Infectious sinusitis in turkeys produces a sinus swelling under the eye as well as an inflammation of respiratory organs. It is a chronic disease adversely affecting growth and feed conversion. It may also cause significant mortality in young poults.

    A peculiar bacterial-like organism known as Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is common to all three conditions. CRD and sinusitis in turkeys are caused by a pure MG infections while the air sac syndrome is caused by an infection of MG in combination with E. coli. These conditions are triggered by acute respiratory infections such as Newcastle disease or infectious bronchitis.

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is widespread and affects many species of birds. Eradication programs have reduced the incidence in recent years. It is primarily spread through the egg. Infected hens transmit organisms and the chick or poult is infected when it hatches. Organisms may also be transmitted by direct contact with infected or carrier birds.


    The true CRD produces slight respiratory symptoms such as coughing, sneezing and a nasal discharge. In the air sac syndrome there is an extensive involvement of the entire respiratory system. The air sacs are often cloudy and contain large amounts of exudate. Affected birds become droopy, feed consumption decreases and there is a rapid loss of body weight.

    Infectious sinusitis in turkeys occurs in two forms. When the "upper" form is present, there is only a swelling of the sinus under the eye. In the "lower" form, the lungs and air sacs are involved. The air sacs become cloudy and may contain large amounts of exudate. Both forms of the disease are usually present in the flock and frequently are present in the same bird.

    Diagnosis of either condition must be based on flock history, symptoms and lesions. Blood tests are useful in determining whether a flock is infected.

    The answer to the MG problem in both chickens and turkeys is eradication of the disease organisms. This goal has been achieved in commercial breeding flocks with voluntary programs conducted by the National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP) and National Turkey Improvement Plan (NTIP). The treatment of CRD, air sac syndrome and the lower form of infectious sinusitis is not considered satisfactory. Many antibiotics have been used with varying success. Whether to give treatment is a decision that must be made on each flock based on economic factors. If treatment is attempted, give high levels of one of the broad spectrum antibiotics (Tylosin, aureomycin, terramycin, gallimycin) either in feed, drinking water or by injections. The "upper"; form of infectious sinusitis can be treated with success by injecting antibiotics into the bird

    Glenda L Heywood Cassville Missouri
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2017
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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  7. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Glenda Heywood
    In my day we had a vet who doctored poultry and small animals
    but as we were raising hens to lay eggs
    we did not care to keep a sick chicken around
    so culling was the least expensive way to deal with it.
    here is a post by a byc reader
    trailrider330 posted
    Last year, I must have called almost 20 vets within a two hours drive of us, only to find that none of them would treat chickens (not even the farm vets or vets that claimed to be aviary vets - guess they only do birds like macaws, cockatiels, etc). I did find one that said they offered gross autopsies on chickens for $100 but they did not offer any care for sick or injured chickens. You would think with all the people with backyard flocks now, there would be vets scrambling to fill that need.
     
  8. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Feb 8, 2017
  9. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Feb 8, 2017
  10. Glenda Heywoodo

    Glenda Heywoodo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Feb 8, 2017

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