Do you HAVE to put posts of an elevated coop in concrete???

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Tigerjane, Jul 1, 2010.

  1. Tigerjane

    Tigerjane Chillin' With My Peeps

    397
    1
    111
    Jun 17, 2010
    Pflugerville, TX
    yep, like the subject line says:
    Is it necessary to put the posts of an elevated coop in concrete?
     
  2. MoSo

    MoSo In the Wild Plum Yonder

    Depends on your soil (and frost heave) but you can put the posts ON concrete (as in blocks) as well. Where I am, it's so dry that even though we have snow in winter, I could have gotten away with putting the posts directly in soil, but I put them on concrete blocks just to be safe.
     
  3. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
    86
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    Not unless you have unstable soil and/or it is going to be a *large* (or just heavy) coop.

    For a typical small coop, as long as the posts are deeply/well-set into stable soil, I'd skip the concrete.

    Although, if severe storm winds are an issue, concrete does help anchor things.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  4. Tigerjane

    Tigerjane Chillin' With My Peeps

    397
    1
    111
    Jun 17, 2010
    Pflugerville, TX
    How deep would you recommend burying the posts?

    And another dumb question: what do you all use to cut the hardware cloth?
     
  5. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    I use wire snips. It is a labor-intensive project. Snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, ad nauseum. Shake out my wrist. Smoke a cigarette. Gaze off into space, watch a chicken do something. Start up again. Snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip, snip.

    Wear gloves, by the way.
     
  6. Boo-Boo's Mama

    Boo-Boo's Mama Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:My DH digs down 2' for the posts IF there are no huge rocks in the way.

    We try to buy the width of hardware cloth that we need so we don't have to cut too much. My husband has a cordless tool that cuts it...need to wear face guard.
     
  7. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

    12,521
    86
    341
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    If frostline is not an issue, I would sink them no less than 2' deep. More if it is sandy soil. Deeper is always better.

    To cut hardwarecloth I use leather gloves and the giant big huge snips I bought for cutting 26-gauge roof tin. They were about $25 I think, some years ago. They are a great big nuisance to use but the fastest way to cut the stuff.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  8. 95yj

    95yj Chillin' With My Peeps

    702
    3
    131
    Nov 25, 2009
    Central Vermont
    if you use tin snips it isn't that bad, also a word of advise, cut the piece of wire to size before putting it on, especially if your doing a window or something, it may not clip nearly as easily or nicely after its on.
     
  9. St-Hubert

    St-Hubert Chicken Convert

    488
    1
    119
    Apr 6, 2010
    Anniston, AL
    I'm in Alabama....hot damp summers and cool winters. I sunk our treated posts (painted first) maybe 1-2 feet into the ground that was already pretty solidly packed. The coop was built from the top down (underneath a porch), and most of the weight is borne by the one actual porch-post I built around, but the extra posts mean it's a little more stable....and we can climb in it without fear of collapse if necessary.
    Granted, the coop has only been in existence about four months now, but we have not had any problems with it. I think I will put the posts of the next coop on blocks this time and build from the bottom up.

    Quote:Definitely concur on the wearing of gloves. The only thing I have to add to this is the ocassional curse and rummaging around for a bandaid. [​IMG]
     
  10. rrgrassi

    rrgrassi Chillin' With My Peeps

    149
    0
    89
    Jun 19, 2010
    Royse City
    Quote:I'm east of Dallas, so we do not have a frost line to deal with. You being close to San Antonio, even better.

    I have my coop on concrete paver blocks and it is made out of the green treated lumber.

    I would only bury the poles and concrete them in if I was making a permanent structure.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by