1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Does anyone have plans for a home made Pullorum test box ??

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by FrenchToast, May 20, 2011.

  1. FrenchToast

    FrenchToast "Draft Apple Ridge" a Bit from Heaven

    4,420
    32
    246
    Jan 10, 2010
    UP North WI
    I just became certified to be a pullorum tester but I hate the thought of spending $100 plus on a pullorum testing box.

    So my question is, Does anyone have instructions on how to make a homemade one ? I would greatly appreciate it if you could share !!


    Thanks Much


    Sandi
    aka
    FrenchToast
     
  2. FrenchToast

    FrenchToast "Draft Apple Ridge" a Bit from Heaven

    4,420
    32
    246
    Jan 10, 2010
    UP North WI
    Can't believe no one has made a pullorum testing box???

    Or where did you get one at a reasonable price??


    Thanks

    Sandi
     
  3. FireTigeris

    FireTigeris Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

    Last edited: May 21, 2011
  4. 0wen

    0wen Chillin' With My Peeps

    652
    82
    111
    Mar 25, 2016
    Southwest Virginia
    I know this is an old thread, but...

    I'm putting one together currently. I'll add photos this weekend.

    I recently became a 'certified pullorum tester' and for the most part, all you really need is a smooth, non-porous surface to do the testing on. Samples in the class were ceramic tiles, plates, plexiglass - you get the idea.. They had a 'pullorum testing unit' on hand, I believe it was the one available at Murray Mcmurray, and I wasn't crazy about it because: 1.) It runs off of a plug-in light, which would obviously be an inconvenience if an outlet isn't available & 2.) It is absolutely overpriced. Basically, what you're getting is a plastic box that isn't any more durable than a stackable storage container (what I'm building mine out of), with a light socket installed and an etched piece of frosted plexiglass to do the testing on...

    I'm using a plastic storage container from Rural King. It was $3 and I'll get a photo and the proper item information listed here in an edit soon. I had originally planned on using one of those battery operated "as seen on TV" light bulbs (here) and I still may since they're only around $14 for a 2 pack, but I plan on testing out some push on L.E.D. lights - some of which are only a couple of bucks, but I wonder if the L.E.D. lights will be too bright and won't diffuse well under the plexiglass..

    On to the testing surface. Plexiglass! You can get a sheet that is pretty much an ideal testing size for a little over $2 at Lowes. If your local hardware doesn't have frosted you can use a fine grit sandpaper on the underside (that you won't be testing on) to get the same effect. I'll either score it with an exacto or possibly mark out the grid on the underside with some sort of marker - I'll test both for preference.

    If the L.E.D light works out and diffuses under the plexiglass, then realistically you could build one of these for $10-$20. In my opinion, despite it being on a budget, it is superior to the pricey units in that it is wireless. I don't plan on permanently attaching my light source, so that I can use the inner compartment to store relevant supplies when transporting..
     
  5. 0wen

    0wen Chillin' With My Peeps

    652
    82
    111
    Mar 25, 2016
    Southwest Virginia
    I decided against the 'stackable storage bin,' even though it should still work. I picked up a toolbox today that was perfect (to me) for the job. A 'stack on' step toolbox - around $20. Everything else was basically the same - a scrap piece of plexiglass from Lowes and a $5 portable lightswitch that was at the counter at Rural King... You could leave the film on the plexiglass to make a nice white background (as seen in a couple of the photos), but I removed mine to make a grid (in progress in a photo or two) - still undecided which I prefer and I'll pick up another pice of plexiglass to try both methods.

    The box holds everything needed for the test - a small collapsible cooler for the antigen, banding pliers, various bands, sanitizing solutions (bleach, alcohol, etc), gloves, shoe covers, paper towels, flock reporting book, bleeder loop, etc - with a fair amount of space left over to add other tools and supplies. About half the cost of the commercial unit.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by