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Does IB make a bird a carrier?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chippysmom327, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. chippysmom327

    chippysmom327 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a hen that I think has Infectious Bronchitis. She's new so my other chickens haven't been exposed. After she gets better can i intorduce her to my flock or will she make all my other chickens carriers? I don't want that to happen, I don't think that's fair. I also wanted to hatch babies in the Spring, and would her babies be carriers of IB?
     
  2. Shabana

    Shabana Chillin' With My Peeps

    As I understand it, she could make them all carriers, but they might never show symptoms or show them only when their immune system is compromised. Im not sure if she can pass it on through the egg.
     
  3. chippysmom327

    chippysmom327 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree, but I don't think it's fair that she'll make all the other birds carriers.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2013
  4. chippysmom327

    chippysmom327 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay, someone educate me of all the cons of IB. I really don't want to cull her, but how will she harm my flock?
     
  5. AshP

    AshP Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 11, 2013
    Hi,

    I would be interested to know what brought you to the conclusion that your chickens have IB. Maybe you could explain?

    Hopefully I can give you some information that will help.

    Chicks are most susceptible to IB I rarely see it in older chickens but its certainly not impossible. In the industry chicks are vaccinated at 0 days at the hatchery and also at 10 Days both by method of spraying a Live vaccine.

    It is Highly infectious the two main methods of travel are aerosol and Humans, That said with your infected chicken segregated the most likely person to pass it on to your other chickens is yourself disinfection of your equipment and footwear etc is essential.

    There are many types of vaccine for many strains its unfortunate that these vaccines are not generally available in small enough doses for people like yourself this is mainly because it is a live vaccine and its unbelievably easy to kill the vaccine before administration (Even exposure to air will kill the vaccine!)

    Personally I would hope you don't have IB. Your main risk is secondary infection either way your best bet is to take precaution and give all your chickens some Anti-Biotic your best bet would be to see your vet and get a prescription for a 3 day treatment of Sodium Salicylate or Octacillin and try to prevent any mortality from secondary infection.

    Hope This helps.

    AP
     
  6. realsis

    realsis Crazy for Silkies

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    Ib is according to my chicken health book one of the mostt contagious poultry diseases. It is spread through infected birds or their respitory discharges. It can travel 1,000 yards through the air. In post mortem findings pale kidneys are found urate crystles are found in tubes leading from kidneys fluid yolk or whole eggs can be found in the adbominal cavity of some hens. Survivors are permanently immune but do become carriers. The symptoms are gasping coughing sneezing wet eyes nasal discharge. It is said to run through the flock from a exposed bird from 24 to 48 hours. Individuals will recover in two to three weeks then are permanently immune to the disease. You will want to treat with antibotics to prevent a secondairy infection particularly air sac disease. Hens will return to production in 6 to 8 weeks after disease. If the other flock mates get the disease they will have the same symptoms as she does. Once the flock is recovered all the birds will be immune to the disease however they will all be carriers at that point meaning if you bring more birds in contact with your flock they too will get the disease if they recover they also become carriers .its a viscous cycle. But if you don't want to cull you could try to maintain a CLOSED flock. I wouldn't bring any other birds in. If your flock has had contact with your infected bird while she was ill then they have been exposed anyway And you can do your best to manage the symptoms and prevent secondary infection. I hope I explained that alright. This is a difficult decision. If the flock has been exposed already you can do your best to manage the illness until the symptoms are gone. But if the flock has not been exposed you have a decision to make and only you know what's best for your flock. I hope this helps. And I'm sorry your bird is ill. Also before I made ANY rash decisions I would get her lab work tested to be sure your really dealing with ib. the vet should be able to test her blood and tell you. without testing you can't be positive ib is what your dealing with. I really hope this helps and wish you The best.
     

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