Does this look like fowl pox?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by PunkinPeep, Oct 25, 2009.

  1. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm posting this for a friend. This is her 7 1/2 week-old buff orpington pullet. She just discovered these bumps this afternoon. No discharge of any kind that i know of.

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  2. greenfamilyfarms

    greenfamilyfarms Big Pippin'

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    Yes, it looks like the dry form of Fowl Pox.
     
  3. eggsrcool

    eggsrcool Sussex Fanatic

    GRAPHIC PIC BELOW!!!!
    Please make sure she is separated! The last thing you want to do is have all the other birds infected. Fowl pox is an extremely dangerous disease in poultry! http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/63/fowl-pox-pox-avian-pox
    http://merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/204801.htm
    http://www.ruleworks.co.uk/Poultry/Fowl-Pox.htm

    Fowl pox is a viral disease spread by the bites of mosquitoes. The infection leads to warty nodules on the bare or non-feathered parts of the head and legs and sometimes lesions in the beak, nostrils and throat. It depends on location, but pox is referred to as either skin pox or 'wet' pox.

    The most common outbreak is the skin form, showing warty-like eruptions. Pale lumps form yellow bumps which may enlarge and run together forming masses of yellow crusts. It takes about a week for these scabs to darken and fall off.
    The 'wet' pox form shows up in the beak, nostrils and throat as cheesy masses which interfere with eating and breathing.


    Treatment is of little value. Lesions normally heal within 4 weeks. In severe cases it may be necessary to remove scabs and treat with antiseptic washes. Adding water soluble vitamin tonic powder to the flocks water source will help them fight this off.
    Warm salt water can be used to clean off nostrils and beaks. The addition of 1 tablespoon of cider vinegar to each gallon of water can help reduce mucus but must not be mixed with the vitamin tonic.


    Prevention by reducing exposure to mosquitoes is the best defense. Screening sheds and coops and by dealing with mosquito habitats. Vaccination is effective and warranted. once you are aware that this is prevalent in your area. Consider this when adding to the flock in subsequent seasons.

    From Another Source:

    If you are considering breeding/raising birds, I strongly suggest that you breed for resistance. These are the birds that get sick and recover, are less sick than others, or don't get sick at all.

    In some instance of poultry disease, it has been found that it IS possible to reduce the amount of out break on your property by doing this. It is much in the same way as some people get more sick than others.

    Although you may not want to and it seems cruel, a still programme of culling and breeding, i.e. culling ANY bird that seems to get sick, will ultimately improve your coop (suggested for the serious breed/farmer but may not be approiate for hobbyists).

    WARNING GRAPHIC!
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    Last edited: Oct 25, 2009
  4. greenfamilyfarms

    greenfamilyfarms Big Pippin'

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    Yes, you can separate her, but since Fowl Pox is spread by mosquitos, there is not guarantee that separation will do any good. Make sure to eliminate any standing water and possible breeding place for mosquitos.
     
  5. eggsrcool

    eggsrcool Sussex Fanatic

    Quote:Definitely. However, just to be on the safe side have her removed, just in case the others haven;t yet been infected.
     
  6. diddlysquat

    diddlysquat New Egg

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    Questions Questions????? All about the pox.

    If you separate bird from flock, after scabs fall off and seems ok, return to flock?

    If birds have dry pox, go through process and live through it, are they immune? Like we are after we get chicken pox?

    Really, nothing to do but give vitamins and rid area of mosquitos and wait?

    Ok to eat dry pox chicken eggs?

    If its wet pox, you can't eat eggs? What happens if you do eat the eggs?

    Anyone know the answers?

    UC Davis says: http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/avian/Fowlpox.pdf
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2009
  7. eggsrcool

    eggsrcool Sussex Fanatic

    Quote:I think they will be carriers for life.
    You need to get rid of mosquitoes to help stop the problem, however I think they are carriers for life, so cant be immune.
    I dont know about eggs, someone else may know.
     
  8. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I think they will be carriers for life.
    You need to get rid of mosquitoes to help stop the problem, however I think they are carriers for life, so cant be immune.
    I dont know about eggs, someone else may know.

    No, that is incorrect. Please see Threehorses' post on this thread: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=257709&p=3

    Fowl
    pox is different from most of the diseases that chickens contract. Most diseases that chickens get - if they survive - do leave them carriers of that disease for life, so they can spread the disease even if they have no symptoms and appear completely healthy. Fowl pox acts sort of similarly to humans' Chicken Pox. It's a virus, and it runs its course, and then it's done.
     
  9. PunkinPeep

    PunkinPeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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  10. Bedste

    Bedste Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you PunkinPeep for setting that straight. It is bad enough to go through this without thinking it is worse than it is. OMG I hope my little Buff is the only one with it.... I do have some standing water from all the rain. I wonder what I can do about that. Thanks everyone for all your help....
     

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