Dog attack, what smell indicates infection? How to keep her from pecking open wound.

Smoy1108

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My Rhode Island was attacked by my dog almost 2 weeks ago. She had a gaping wound spanning from the right side of her neck towards the bottom, all along her right wing. Kind of like my dog grabbed her wing and tried to rip it off. I took her to a nearby vet and he stitched her up.
4 days later I tried letting her outside for a few minutes and the others started attacking her. I noticed that her wound had opened up, it also had a smell and some drainage. I took her back to the vet to get stitched up again. They also put her on a 5 day course of Septra which she finished on Saturday 11/10. She’s been lethargic and quiet this whole time. Eating and drinking some. I have kept her separated from the flock in a quiet place in the house.
I have noticed the smell this whole time. I was hoping the antibiotics would have taken care of it but it hasn’t. So I am not sure if this smell is normal or not. What does infection smell like?
Yesterday I checked her stiches and it looks like she has been pecking at her stitches and opened some of her wound back up (pictures provided). She has also been pecking some of her feathers out. How do I get this to close back up? My husband doesn’t want to spend any more money on vet visits.
 

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DobieLover

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The bad smell certainly indicates an infection has set in. It does not sound as if the antibiotic was effective in controlling/preventing infection. Either wrong dose, not long enough course or inappropriate drug for the bacteria present in the wound.
A bad smell and a wound are not a good combination.
Stitches are generally scheduled to be removed 7-10 days after they are put in. That wound has not closed. I would get her back to the vet in the morning.
 

Eggcessive

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Can you get some chlorhexidene (Hibiclens) in the first aid aisle of your Walmart or pharmacy. Mix it with water (the label will say how much) and cleanse the wound, then dry it. Apply some plain Neosporin ointment after cleaning it twice a day. Infection smells like you would think—foul or rotten. Call your vet and tell them what is happening, and ask about them about ordering another antibiotic. Clavamox probably would be good. Stitches are removed after 10-14 days, but if the wound is coming apart, they may need to stay longer. You will either need to remove them or take her to the vet. Normally, they don’t charge for removing stitches, so ask.
 

Smoy1108

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The bad smell certainly indicates an infection has set in. It does not sound as if the antibiotic was effective in controlling/preventing infection. Either wrong dose, not long enough course or inappropriate drug for the bacteria present in the wound.
A bad smell and a wound are not a good combination.
Stitches are generally scheduled to be removed 7-10 days after they are put in. That wound has not closed. I would get her back to the vet in the morning.

Thank you! I wasn’t sure what was a normal smell for the healing process. It seems she may need more antibiotics. I’ll have to call the vet again in the morning.
 

DobieLover

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Thank you! I wasn’t sure what was a normal smell for the healing process. It seems she may need more antibiotics. I’ll have to call the vet again in the morning.
My dog was attacked by the neighbors GSDs and had a few pretty nasty wounds that were stapled up. He was put on Augmentin which is Amoxicillin and clavulanate. Poultrydvm.com states that drug combo is safe for use in chickens but there is an egg withdrawal period. Not that it would matter in this case as I'm sure your girl isn't laying.
Following are the dosage guidelines for poultry:
If given via IM, 50 mg/kg body weight. If given orally, 100-175 mg/kg once to twice a day. If given in drinking water, 0.5 g/L.
I would follow the advice offered by @Eggcessive and flush that wound out and dress it with triple antibiotic ointment WITHOUT pain relievers in it. But would still contact the vet first thing in the morning and explain what is going on.
I hope she makes it.
 
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DobieLover

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Is blu kote dangerous in an wound like that? that can help prevent pecking
Bluekote is isopropyl alcohol based and should not be applied to a deep puncture wound.
This bird cannot be returned to the flock until the infection is cleared up and the wound is fully closed. She may need to be reintegrated back into the flock as if she were new depending on how long she is kept isolated.
If she starts to get better and is eating and drinking well, spending a few hours a day secured in a crate around her flock mates may help her eventual return to the coop.
 

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