Dog attack

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by PriorySchool, Jan 4, 2017.

  1. PriorySchool

    PriorySchool Just Hatched

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    Oct 21, 2016
    Hi all,

    So it seems that unfortunately someone left the gate open on our chicken run (our coop and run are part of a school project so a curious child is likely to blame). They all made it back in but a dog got to one of the birds and ripped the skin off the back of her neck. I did not witness the attack but she was very lucky. As I said only the skin was ripped off and done so surprisingly cleanly. There is no active bleeding the neck is not broken and there are no signs of a puncture at all. There is simply no skin left.

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    I coated the wound with lydicane free neosporin but could not wrap it without inhibiting breathing. I'm not worried that she will peck at it seeing that the wound is on the back of the neck. I would just like to know what others have done in this situation. How likely is she to survive?

    Thanks,

    Noah
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Applying Neosporin is fine. There is usually no need to wrap the wound. Keep her separated and offer some poultry vitamins in her water if you have them. Check her over for any puncture wounds under her wings/body.

    Barring infection, internal or nerve damage, chickens can make a full recovery from wound like this. Just keep watch on the wound, look for signs of infection (pus, oozing or odors). Make sure she is staying hydrated. Give some extra protein like egg or tuna in addition to her normal feed.


    Keep us posted.
     
  3. Tillicans

    Tillicans Out Of The Brooder

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    I had a dog attack my Australop before Xmas, took a big chunk off her tail end, very exposed skin, no puncures. I used hydrogen peroxide diluted to firstly rinse the wound and allow any foreign matter to be drawn out. Then I poured benadiene not sure about spelling lol. then a produce fella gave me sound advise to put Stockholme tar on the wound to seal it and it also acts as an antiseptic. Because it also deters flies and the taste is foul, they wont get pecked. I kept her indoors for three days. She recovered in three days, the skin was healed almost instantly as a new skin was formed by the tar. Magical stuff. it may not suit you but it sure worked for my hen she is happy now with beautiful new feathers on her back and tail.
     
  4. PriorySchool

    PriorySchool Just Hatched

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    Oct 21, 2016
    Thanks for the responses,

    I put her in her own container with food water and a heat lamp, so she isn't bullied by the other birds. She seems to be enjoying the heat lamp. I'll try adding some extra protein to the feed. There are no signs of any sort of infection yet which is good. I think I will definitely re apply some more neosporin but wash with peroxide first. I will also put up some more pics later this morning.
     
  5. PriorySchool

    PriorySchool Just Hatched

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    Oct 21, 2016
    Here she is this morning. She appears to be scabbing over. I plan to keep on applying neosporin. I don't think I should rinse with peroxide if she is scabbing over, right?

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  6. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    If she were mine I would leave the peroxide off. Just re-apply the Neosporin to keep skin a bit moist and to help protect it. Wound looks clean and is starting to heal.

    Peroxide is usually fine for a one time initial cleaning a wound that has a lot of dirt/debris, but can damage skin/tissue with repeated use. Most all of us have first aid "kits" at hand for our chickens, I do have Peroxide in mine, but prefer something like Betadine or even warm soapy water to clean a wound/cut - just depends on the situation.

    Keep us posted, I think she will do just fine as long as she drinks well and eats.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
  7. PriorySchool

    PriorySchool Just Hatched

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    I was just applying some neosporin and noticed that there are a couple of feathers that are partially under the scab. Are these a problem?

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  8. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Are you cleaning the wound daily? Twice daily is better. It will keep infection at bay. It should also prevent the occurrence of feathers getting caught in the wound. Use warm water and soap. Keep the wound moist as you've been doing. Good job!
     
  9. PriorySchool

    PriorySchool Just Hatched

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    Oct 21, 2016
    I just cleaned the wound and reapplied some neosporin. I removed all the feathers from the wound with tweezers and cut off feathers from the area around the wound to prevent this from happening in the future.

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    The pictures are not so great as she would not stop moving her head around. She is still eating, drinking, pooping, and moving around her enclosure just fine.
     
  10. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Looks good!
     

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