Dog had 3 seizure yesterday

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by horsejody, Dec 29, 2008.

  1. horsejody

    horsejody Squeaky Wheel

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    Poor Leo he had 3 grand mal seizures yeaterday. He has been seeing the doggie neurologist and has had occasional seizures. He has never had 3 in one day. The poor baby. DS is home with him today. Hopefully, there won't be any more. I talked to the vet this morning. All of his meds are being increased. I guess the stress of the holidays gets to the aniamls too. Anybody else have an epileptic dog?
     
  2. KellyHM

    KellyHM Overrun With Chickens

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    I have one that has occasional seizures...luckily they're not frequent enough for him to need meds. His allergies on the other hand...[​IMG]
     
  3. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

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    we had a Siberian Husky that started having seizures after she turned 5 due to a rabies shot (what a lot of people don't realize is even though the shots our animals are to get are made for them, they aren't created to help all pets in the same way and some have serious adverse reactions to shots). Ten days from her rabies shot they started, anytime we greeted her, or she got excited/happy she'd go into a severe siezure (the kind where she can't even breath, she'd bite cement, eyes gone, ripping toe nails out if she's near anything hard, torn fur and skin...it was traumatic for all of us, and once she'd come to and stand up (wobbily) she'd lower her head and growl at us like she was awild dog, (otherwise she was the sweetest dog in the world) the vet said this was due to her not seeing or hearing correctly so to her, we lookedlike monsters and she was just trying to defend herself. we were told to keep her outdoors ina kennel to keep us safe from her and her safe from dog fights while coming to.

    The seizure meds only worked for half a year and then they no longer helped no matter the dosage...it got to the point she'd just randomly have seizxures even when not excited. We called up our vet bawling, asking him what to do, (he felt horrible he was the one that gave the rabiesshot that started it)---he is the only vet i know of who WILL not put animals to sleep he refuses to.....no matter his emotional reason it's a really disheartening t hing when an animal is suffering....anywhoo...he recccomended we call our other vet to get her PTS. We did and they agreed she needed put down that it was no life to live....(the poor dog looked like someone beat her daily, to say the least how severe her seizures were---even her teeth were getting filed down) the one tech there said that htey had a GSD that got seizures from a rabies shot (at around the same age as Sydney) and they fought to keep him well for a few years, but he soon progressed worse, and almost attacked thier todler ona few occations upon coming out of a seizure...so they decided it was in everyones best interest if he was put down....and they agreed it was best for Sydney too.

    On the ride to the vets she had another massive seizure in her kennel...and we're pretty sure she sprained her leg or tore a tendon in the process because at the vets she couldnt walk on it. We were devistated.....while we waited what seemed like forever (in reality it was about a minute) for the tech to take her back to get PTS....she was panting heavily and looking at us with glossy eyes....it hurt so bad when they took her way. Feels like just yesterday this happened, it was 3 years ago.

    I HATE Every year when i have to give my babies rabies shots...luckily none of the ones i have now seem to be sensitive to the shot. I know one lady who's Chihuahua has a crator in betweenher shoulder blades (that you could put a medium sized apple into) where the rabies shot was placed....it ate away at her flesh and needed removed. <---Edited to mention, my babies are young still, and Ive been on a roll every year getting a new cat so that's what i mean by everyyear lol. Well first shot, then another a year later then what is it something like 3 years later etc....

    This is why theres actually a group of people who demand better reserach into the rabies vaccine and other vaccines directed at pets. The feline leukiemia shot is known to cause cancer even. It's just upsetting. I mean some animals have seizures from non-shot reasons, but many suffer needlessly from shots.

    Here was Sydney at- 2 1/2 years old with her first litter (she had two litters):

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2008
  4. Their Other Mother

    Their Other Mother Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Poor Pup, Hope the new meds help, [​IMG]
     
  5. what was i thinking

    what was i thinking Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 1, 2008
    cny ny
  6. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

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    Quote:I just read your post, had she had a rabies shot or any sort of shot reciently before they started? sounds so much like Sydneys problem she had [​IMG]
     
  7. horsejody

    horsejody Squeaky Wheel

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    We will never know for sure, but we suspect the epilepsy may have been a reaction to a distemper shot. Many people don't realize it, but there are 2 types of distemper shots. There is a live virus one and a killed virus one. The live virus is cheaper so it is the choice of most vets. The downside is that the live virus can actually cause a swelling in the brain. It's rare, but still a risk. Leo ended up with a rare case of adult onset hydrocephalus. It can only be seen on brain scans, mri's etc. I wish I had known. I am the type that would gladly pay the extra dollar or two for a safer shot. The scans of Leo's brain show two small pockets of fluid in the back of his brain. He takes a steroid to reduce the swelling and prevent seizures. I'll bet your Husky had something similar. They can treat it with a drug called dexamethazone. It's not a seizure med, it's a steroid
     
  8. what was i thinking

    what was i thinking Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 1, 2008
    cny ny
    no nothing. started when i got the chickens. i thouht for sure i would be getting rid of them. but she was kicked by the horse both hooves in face a couple months before. vet thinks that might have been it because of her age.
    good news is nothing since then!!! thanks for everyones well wishes and wish the same for leo and all others who have to watch their doggies go thru it.
    sorry monarc about sydney.
     
  9. Wifezilla

    Wifezilla Positively Ducky

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    A ketogenic (hat fat, low carb) diet is often used to treat seizures that don't respond to medication for people... particularly kids. Any reason it wouldn't work for a dog???
     
  10. horsejody

    horsejody Squeaky Wheel

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    Quote:I just read your post, had she had a rabies shot or any sort of shot reciently before they started? sounds so much like Sydneys problem she had [​IMG]

    Wow, I just read your post. It sounds like when Leo started. Many vets are quick to diagnose "idiopathic epilepsy." That just means that they don't know the cause and the symtoms are treated rather than the cause. I took Leo to the neurologist and had his head scanned and an eeg done. It was discovered that he had adult onset hydrocephalus. He now gets a steroid to control that. Until yesterday, he was doing well. The vet thinks it was the stress, or perhaps he thew up a pill and we didn't know it. I would definitely suggest you get your dog to a neurologist. We found out that if we had just put him on the seizure meds recommended by the regular vet, the hydrocephalus would have worsened and killed him. Also, be forwarned, seizures have what is called a kindling effect. The more seizures a dog has, the more he/she will be prone to them in the future, regardless of treatment. The neurologist explained it this way. He said that a seizure starts when a defective nerve or nerves in the brain get excited and a chain reaction gets started. The reacting nerves damage the nerves around them. Each seizure results in more defective nerves. The more defective nerves you have, the more likely you are to have a seizure.
     

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