Dog Problem (no losses yet)

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by pipdzipdnreadytogo, Jun 29, 2011.

  1. pipdzipdnreadytogo

    pipdzipdnreadytogo Dorking Queen Premium Member

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    I'm in need of some advice here. My grandmother lives downstairs and every day, she walks her little terrier dog OUTSIDE the dog run where the chickens and Guineas free-range every day. This has never been a problem before (to my knowledge), but yesterday, I set the Guineas loose a bit early (I had to leave for a class, but my sister promised to keep an eye on them) and apparently this dog was chasing them around (while I was gone, luckily for HIM). When I expressed my anger, I heard another story of him RELENTLESSLY chasing one of my chickens, one of my girls! He has done this before, but a very long time ago. Now I'm wondering if he's been chasing the hens more than I'm aware of...
    Now, it wouldn't be a problem otherwise. Just tell her to keep her dog where he can't get at the birds, right? But my grandmother is not that easy to convince. She says her dog has 'never done anything like this before' as he's chasing the birds (which, by the way, isn't true). She will 'forget' it has happened and deny it. I'm afraid he's going to injure or kill a bird before we manage to convince her, and at that point it'll be too late. This dog has been treated like a human child all his life by my grandmother and so he thinks he can get away with anything and frequently does. She even thinks he understands every single thing she says to him. He has snapped at small children before (including my going-on-two-years-old niece). He growls and attacks the other dogs. He has even bitten my grandmother (which she now denies). This dog is a danger to everyone and everything in its path, but we just can't get my grandmother to understand and take proper measures.
    Know that if ANYTHING happens to ANY of MY BIRDS, I WILL NOT HESITATE TO DO THIS DOG IN. But I love my grandmother and this dog somehow brings her a lot of joy, so I don't want to take that strong of action before I have to. I'm wondering if maybe anyone knows a way to train him out of this? Or maybe the best course would be to put a padlock on the gate so she can't take him out of the dog run? We'll be replacing the dog run fence before long and I've already discussed with my mom about simply not putting a gate on it, since we infrequently go from the front yard to the dog run and it's just as easy going through the house. Anyone have another idea, maybe? I'd be willing to try anything at this point, but my grandmother may not agree to some things...
     
  2. krcote

    krcote Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can you ask your grandmother to walk her dog on a leash?
     
  3. pipdzipdnreadytogo

    pipdzipdnreadytogo Dorking Queen Premium Member

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    Quote:Unfortunately that would involve her admitting that her dog is doing something wrong... I will definitely ask, but I doubt it will work.
     
  4. krcote

    krcote Chillin' With My Peeps

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    BUT it would certainly be your easiest option!
     
  5. pipdzipdnreadytogo

    pipdzipdnreadytogo Dorking Queen Premium Member

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    That's quite true. [​IMG] Heck, maybe if I pester her for a while, she'll actually resign to using a leash...
     
  6. AKsmama

    AKsmama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd flat out tell her the dog has to be walked on a leash or he's going to get hurt. You can do it nicely since it's your grandmother and an elder- but I'd let her know in no uncertain terms what will happen.
     
  7. wayneh

    wayneh Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Check your locat ordenance about dogs. Some towns have leash laws. Does yours? If it does, pass this along to Grandmaw, let her know she is breaking the law and could be sited. Even if your town doesn't, you could say it does. sometimes a little white lie goes a long way. Hope you get this worked out before there is any bad blood between you and Grandmaw, or blood on the ground from your chicks or the dog.
     
  8. pipdzipdnreadytogo

    pipdzipdnreadytogo Dorking Queen Premium Member

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    I think that's what it's gonna have to be. I don't want to be mean about it (because, of course, it's grandma), but I'm gonna tell her he needs to be on a leash. Other people are outside all the time so I'll know if she's not holding true to this new rule, and I think I'll even put leashes and signs around as little reminders, on the gatepost, on her doorknob, etc. I'll let y'all know how it goes. If that doesn't work, I'm just gonna go ahead with the padlock on the gate. The darned dog run is big enough for her darned dog to take a darned tinkle in, darn it. [​IMG]
    (We live out in the country, no leash laws. I think she's aware of that, too, or I'd certainly try the little white lie.)

    Thanks for the advice--not sure why the leash didn't occur to me before.
     
  9. Dogfish

    Dogfish Rube Goldberg incarnate

    Mar 17, 2010
    Western Washington
    Family matters are difficult. The dog needs to be able to run free in the yard at times. So do the birds. Work out a schedule and be adult about the situation. Share.
     
  10. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Even the open, very rural country usually has leash laws; however, leash laws pertain to public property, and the property of others. As long is your dog is on your own property, it need not be leashed to be in compliance with the law.

    First question, who owns your home--your parents or your grandmother? If it is your parents, then they need to set the rules for where the dog is allowed to be and when. If it is your grandmother's, the SHE sets the rules.

    Dogfish's comment about setting and sharing a schedule is an excellent idea. You can also consider covering hte sides of the pen where the chickens are with shadecloth or other opaque material so that the birds and dog do not have direct view of each other. It won't help the dog's smelling them and knowing htey are present, but terriers' often react to the latest, most obvious stimulation, not the one lurking in the background--so perhaps it will choose to chase the squirrel that is mocking him from up in a tree, or a butterfly that flutters past, or the dog barking down the road.
     

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