dog problems.

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Molly Sunshine, Oct 16, 2014.

  1. Molly Sunshine

    Molly Sunshine Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 19, 2014
    Southern illinois
    Our new neighbor brought a dog along. He is on a tie out with a doghouse most days, however we were woken up at 2:30am to the dog barking louder than usual. Luckily we got there in time. The dog had slipped his collar off and was going after our rabbits (we have a rabbit tractor that we keep growing rabbits in) the dog wouldn't leave our yard without force. My husband had to chase him off with a stick, and my husband is 6.5 feet tall and 300 lbs. I usually let my chickens and ducks out to freerange but am now afraid that the dog will get lose again. No doubt if that happened it would be awful. There is a leash law but as our dog is fine with all animals (including that dog) and only leaves our yard to play with the neighbor who lives to throw things for him I would hate to not be able to let our dog out. Other than having a predator - prey attraction to our animals I think the dog is fine. Other than fencing (which we can't really afford right now, but plan on doing a little at a time) can anyone think of a way I could safely let my animals out to get some grass? I simply do not trust the tie out or the dog. he could break his collar, the tie out... I am also unsure of how to respectfully tell our new neighbor that if his dog is ever caught hunting/chasing our animals on our property we will be in the right to do whatever necessary. I hate the thought of having it come to that but I will not put myself in danger trying to pull the dog away. We will use whatever we can to get him away. suggestions?
     
  2. CrazyTalk

    CrazyTalk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 10, 2014
    The owner should take better care of their dog - tie outs are terrible.


    That being said, if the tractors can't keep out the dog, they're not going to keep out raccoon, coyotes, or anything else. If you can't afford to fence the yard, buying a $100 solar electric fence charger and putting some hot wire on the tractors might work. Dogs learn about electric fences really quick.
     
  3. Molly Sunshine

    Molly Sunshine Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 19, 2014
    Southern illinois
    I agree. I hate tie outs, while I have had to use them in the past I have never left my dog out on a tie out for more than an hour or so while I cleaned or was airing out the house. I think they should only be used temporarily and never as a means of permanent confinement.

    I have been thinking of a hot wire ever since we had a raccoon get some chickens but after we killed the raccoon and reinforced the coop we have had zero issues with predators until now.

    We used one to keep our dogs from digging under the fence when I was young unfortunately we had a smart dog that dug way back and way under it and got out so it wasn't really effective. She was especially smart though. I don't believe the average dog would figure that out.

    He did not make it into the tractor just stretched the fencing, we plan on reinforcing it with hardware cloth

    I also only let my chickens out when I am here to watch them. however I usual am in and out of the house. He doesn't pull at his tie out but I know from experience that all it would take was one hard tug no matter the strength of the tie out also I doubt it is inspected for breakage is the plastic coating which can cause rust, then breakage. I will mention the hot wire to my husband hopefully we can get one set up soon. Is the current strong enough to hurt a chicken, should they ever come in contact with it? I may as well learn everything I can!
     
  4. Molly Sunshine

    Molly Sunshine Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 19, 2014
    Southern illinois
    I also forgot to mention we live just barely in city limits. Luckily coyotes aren't a problem.
     
  5. CrazyTalk

    CrazyTalk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Electric fence typically has current in the milliamps, and is a couple thousand volts. It's startling, and it hurts, but it doesn't do any real damage.

    In addition, poultry are well insulated, and only seem to actually get shocked if they get it in the face or their feet.
     
  6. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Ditto on the electric fence suggestion. Sounds like it's probably your only possible solution at this point. Some kind of fencing is needed one way or another and you can put up some hot wire relatively quick and it's not terribly expensive. That is what I use along with welded wire fencing and I have yet to see any dog make a second attempt to get in after getting zapped. They always get it on the nose and it hurts!
     
  7. Molly Sunshine

    Molly Sunshine Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 19, 2014
    Southern illinois
    Wonderful. I imagine a duck would be the same? Actual skin contact would have to happen for them to be shocked? We may do some of this around the property line, at least on that side. Our other neighbors are wonderful wonderful.
     

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