Dogs and Chicken Poo

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Kolibree, Aug 8, 2013.

  1. Kolibree

    Kolibree Out Of The Brooder

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    We are in the process of building our coop, but unsure what to do about a run. We really want a chicken tractor, but we have lots of dogs (we used to be rescue fosters and kept a bunch :) ). I'm worried that when we move the tractor, the dogs will be eating and rolling in the chicken poo. How often do you move the tractor? And how much do they poo while outside? Seems like it would be hard to clean the poo out of the grass. Anyone have any ideas to share? :/:/We had tons of chickens on the farm when I was growing up, but they were always free range, the only thing we had to do was clean the coop. :/
     
  2. 4 the Birds

    4 the Birds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Most people that have tractors move it every week or two. If you have land, I would put the tractor inside a pasture or fenced area that the dogs cannot access. This will keep the dogs from getting into the poo and getting up close to bark and harass the birds in the tractor. The poo stays in the grass as fertilizer unless you really want to rake it up. Personally I would consider a stationary coop with fence area. Much less work and easier to have a nice size coop and run. Also easier to fortify.

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    Last edited: Aug 8, 2013
  3. GardenDave

    GardenDave Out Of The Brooder

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    Could you just train your dogs not to eat it? I don't know how many you have so not sure how practical such a task would be, but it is what I did with my two Alsations. The chickens and dogs share the garden now. The chickens do not bother with the dogs. In fact the other day when I caught one on my veg patch and she knew she was in trouble she ran away from me and UNDER one of the dogs lol. They are more bothered by the rabbits. They don't have a clue what the hell a rabbit is and freak out every time it goes near them lol

    Once or twice one of the dogs ate chicken poo but once they learned not to do it they don't.
     
  4. youngoilguy

    youngoilguy New Egg

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    My hunting lab eats chicken poo and I can't get her to stop. I have an e collar on her and she know poo=pain but she eats it anyway. Our 3 jack Russells leave it alone. I move my tractor everyday so the flock has fresh grass.
     
  5. Kolibree

    Kolibree Out Of The Brooder

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    Well, we have 9 dogs, so no way we could possibly train them to not eat the poo. :( They are pretty well behaved, so I don't worry about them barking at or bothering the chickens. I guess a stationary coop would be the best for us. I have a nice place under a big oak tree for shade, and we have an acre and a half so plenty of room for a nice big run. I was also concerned about the ground inside a stationary coop getting mucky, but I see most of you use something in the run. I also have a large area fenced off for my garden where I could let them free range (when the garden isn't going to be a casualty!) occasionally. I wish I could let them free in our yard, but I do think if they were loose the dogs would chase, and we also have hawks around here like crazy.:rolleyes:
     
  6. iheartnh

    iheartnh Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wow - 9 dogs!!!!! Good for you! I've been active in dog rescue for a long time, and "failed" at fostering more than once, too!

    I also think you'll be happier with a stationary coop and non-free ranging birds - especially with that many dogs and hawks!
     
  7. whitt910

    whitt910 Out Of The Brooder

    They're going to eat poo. We have two dogs and they eat horse poop, cow poop and chicken poop... There isn't anything you can do about it. I don't know what it is about it but they love it. Our dogs don't chase the chickens. We started the chicks off inside the house and then transitioned them outside and at first our big dog thought they belonged in her mouth but she got reprimanded and that was it. Now that the chickens are big and outside they don't chase them at all. In fact the roosters keep the dogs in line and will attack the dogs if they're too close. It's all about the temperament of your dogs and how you introduce them to your flock.
     
  8. c2chicks

    c2chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    We had built a great little tractor for our 3 girls, but had the "dog eating poo" problem as well. After we moved the tractor (every few days) I would rake and hose off the spot where it was. The dogs (gotta love 'em ;) would still roll and dig and even eat the dirt and grass where the tractor had been. Needless to say, we fenced off a few hundred sq ft for the chickens and the dogs do not get invited in! 9 dogs would be pretty tough to train (for free ranging purposes)--it only takes one to wipe out a flock--I agree with the above poster: build a stationary coop and a nice sturdy fence!
     
  9. Kolibree

    Kolibree Out Of The Brooder

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    The dogs are all small, between 8 and 20 lbs except for one. A 125 lb Akita. Husband agrees, a stationary coop, and let them free range in our garden area occasionally, but only while we are out with them (afraid of Hawks). I suppose it's too late in the season to get chickens, I imagine we won't be done with the coop until sometime in Sept. If that's the case we'll take our time and build a nice coop and run so it's ready for them in the spring. I love all the ideas and ingenuity on here!
     
  10. iheartnh

    iheartnh Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You could raise chicks starting mid-late Winter - depending on breed, they might be lay-ready by late Spring/early Summer
     

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