Dominant hen:rooster situation

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by HappyHandsHomestead, Jun 19, 2019.

  1. HappyHandsHomestead

    HappyHandsHomestead In the Brooder

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    Greetings! I am new to chicken ownership. I have three 11-week-old chickens, a black one we’re sure is a hen, an EE rooster (he’s a little guy), and a fat BO who I believe is a hen as well. The BO seems to be the dominant figure in the flock. Does anyone have a dominant hen when there’s a rooster in the flock also? Can I just leave it that way, or will problems I’m currently unaware of arise down the road? At present, my rooster doesn’t crow often (even though he can), and I would like to keep him as quiet as possible because I am not allowed to have Roos within city limits. I want to keep him until I find him a good home rather than feel forced to kill him for lack of better options. I have read that roosters will often not crow if there is a more dominant rooster (or a Boss Lady BO??) in charge of the flock, so I’m particularly interested in maintaining whatever this dynamic is so that this guy can hang with us a bit longer. I was just curious if this sounds like total rubbish or if any of it makes sense/rings true for anyone else here? They all seem to get along beautifully.
     
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  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Got my Puppy

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    Your birds are still babies. Once they start sexually maturing everything will change.
     
  3. rosemarythyme

    rosemarythyme Free Ranging

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    You don't have roosters and hens yet, you have cockerels and pullets that are still pretty young. As the birds mature and hormones get going the cockerel should take over.
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Then best to start planning now how you'll get rid of him asap.
    You don't want to endanger everyone's ability to keep layers in your area.
    Not to mention losing your own flock and a possible fine to boot.
     
  5. Chickassan

    Chickassan Wattle Fondler

    A rooster plus a dominate hen are a whole lot of things...quiet isn't one of them.
    2X every single flippin noise that a chicken can make at full volume because they compete for the biggest stones trophy every... single...day. :barnie
     
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  6. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Crowing

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    I know you are so hoping that other chicken lovers will have a way to make this work, and we don't. You are right, it is rubbish, wishful thinking. Chicks are a lot of fun, and roosters are the most sweet, forward, cheeky, loving attention...impossible to imagine them as aggressive, violent bullies.

    As stated above - they will change, and the rooster will change the most. Roosters are a crap shoot, some turn out, and some do not.

    As this is your first time with chickens, I too would recommend getting the rooster gone, ASAP. Roosters in my opinion take a little experience. I would strongly recommend an all hen flock for the first year.

    If you have children under age of 6 I strongly recommend no rooster, especially if they share the play area. Roosters often attack children first, and have ruined the whole chicken experience for a lot of kids.

    As for how, contact your extension office, and ask if there is a local poultry club, put up a sign at the feed store, advertise on facebook. Do not ask questions as to why they want the rooster, not your responsibility.

    Roosters, as AArt is fond of saying, is where the romance meets reality and often times it is an ugly reality. You are not suppose to have him, he won't be quiet, people will know, and a bully hen, will be no match for him once the hormones hit.

    This is a wonderful hobby that I have enjoyed for years. I love having chickens, but you have to be realistic.

    Mrs K
     
  7. HappyHandsHomestead

    HappyHandsHomestead In the Brooder

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    Thanks for this reply. I have found him a home. I do have two little boys under the age of six, and I was wondering if it was naive to think he’d remain sweet. He’s already beginning to act in a dominant fashion toward me. I can’t imagine how he’d behave toward my kids. I’m going to rehome him next week to a sanctuary that specifically takes roosters. He is so beautiful, but I have to look past that and heed these warnings.
     
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  8. HappyHandsHomestead

    HappyHandsHomestead In the Brooder

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    Jun 8, 2019
    Thanks, everyone. I actually considered having him neutered, but my vet said even that isn’t fail proof in terms of preventing crowing. She encouraged me to find him a home and gave me quite a few resources. He’s moving out next week, and that’s just how the cookie crumbles. Now, I’m down to two gals from six chicks, and I swear, if my buff Orpington turns out to be a dude, I might be done with chickens. (Not true, but still:))
     
  9. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Crowing

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    I am glad, it is a tough decision, and one is not into chickens very long when they realize it is not all roses. With the little ones, you will have so much fun finding eggs... not dealing with a rooster.
     

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