Done: Treating Wing/Back Injury? and Dispatching Rooster?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Wonderling, Jul 16, 2019.

  1. Wonderling

    Wonderling Chirping

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    Hen: Poppy the Australorp
    She was getting a bit bald from the big rooster who I re-homed a few days ago, trying to move her into the other coop resulted in the little Polish rooster being a psycho and keeping her forced in a corner and accosting her anytime she tried to go anywhere. We introduced her last night when they were all roosting and it seemed quiet at the time. I got up early to check on them and as soon as I saw her injury I removed the rooster from the coop, into dog crate outside. The other hen isn't bothering her so I wanted to let her remain in the coop where she'd be less stressed than in a cage. Both sides seem to be injured but the side not shown is much less severe.
    Poppy-Injury.png
    How/What should I treat her injury with? I'm still pretty new to this and before I go out and buy the first chicken meds I find I'd like to get a little input from more chicken knowledgeable people on how to go about caring for this properly.
    Edit: Treating with Triple Antibiotic ointment, thanks for the advise.

    Rooster: Speedy the Polish rooster
    Thank you for the advice, he was dispatched quickly and humanely so I'm glad for that. It's unfortunate that was the only real conclusion for him but it's for the best.
    None of the hens want anything to do with him but he's proved that he's not harmless as we thought and that was his only redeeming quality besides his silly happy dancing when he gets treats. I've given him far too many chances and this was the last straw. I don't feel comfortable trying to re-home him due to his behavior and because he's still recovering from a severe case of poultry lice (still walks like he's drunk). I've decided my best and almost only choice is to humanely dispatch/slaughter him. Is the upside-down cone/throat cut butchering style the best way to go?
    Note: We will not be eating him, since he's not healthy it seems a poor choice.


    (Figured I'd post this all together rather than as two separate threads, hope that's okay.)
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2019
  2. Folly's place

    Folly's place Crossing the Road

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    So sorry! Is she eating and drinking? If she's alert and eating, consider raw honey, or another wound dressing, after making sure it's clean and her only wound. In this hot weather, flies and maggots are a real risk (fly strike) and she may need to be indoors for a time, until it's not raw.
    For Speedy, the cone and cutting his head off will work well. have a very sharp knife, and just do it fast.
    I tried cervical dislocation once on a larger rooster, and it was not good, so don't try that.
    There's no excuse for his behavior!
    Hope your girl recovers well, it's likely that she will do fine.
    Mary
     
    coach723 likes this.
  3. Wonderling

    Wonderling Chirping

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    Thanks. She's fine otherwise so I'm planning to treat it and keep a close eye on her. If I don't have raw hone what would you suggest? I can bring her inside if needed, she's semi-tame so it shouldn't be too bad, I just didn't want to isolate her if I could help it.
    I'll probably take care of him this afternoon. I've watched some how-to videos for it before, I'll watch a couple before going out to take care of it.
     
  4. coach723

    coach723 Crowing

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    Agree with everything posted above. Just wanted to add that the knife does need to be VERY sharp, otherwise it doesn't go well. I have a pair of tree/limb loppers that are kept sharp and used only for this purpose, for me it's less prone to goofs. I use the cone, face them away from me, and lop, one motion and done. Here is one article:
    https://www.muranochickenfarm.com/2017/06/the-easiest-way-to-cull-chicken.html
     
  5. coach723

    coach723 Crowing

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    You can use plain neosporin or triple antibiotic ointment (without pain killer), or veterycin spray.
     
  6. Wonderling

    Wonderling Chirping

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    Thanks! That's a good idea, I do have some sharp limp loppers that are quite new.
     
  7. Wonderling

    Wonderling Chirping

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    Thank you! Thank you!
     

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