Don't know what to do and need advice!

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by chickenmamakimberly, Aug 17, 2018.

  1. chickenmamakimberly

    chickenmamakimberly Chirping

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    Long post.... I have been asking a ton of questions. Such a newbie.... And I seriously have no idea what I am doing. I stumbled upon chicken addiction completely by accident. I have 2 mutt EE and 4 Polish Silkie cross, 2 of which are cockerels. I want to add at least 2 pullets so I can have a few eggs, although my chicks are more of pets than anything. I know I will have to part with 1 roo when we get to that point. I'm waiting to see how it goes. Anyway, I have contacted a couple of hatcheries in town, I'm in middle Tennessee, and the last guy has me worried. I want to get chicks either the same age, 8 weeks, or younger. I do not want older hens that will harm my flock. He said that on any farm there are germs, which I'm aware of, but he said to give the new chickens bleach water because they may come with a cold. Is this a red flag or normal practice? And should I just wait until the chicks I have mature and hatch my own new chicks so I don't have to worry about disease and integration? Or should I get a few day old chicks and brood them? The only area I have besides the coop and run is a brooder and a small cage that will house up to 5 chicks 5 weeks in age. I really appreciate any advice. I am struggling with what to do.
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Crossing the Road

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    RED FLAG!!!
    He's right that any birds may have been exposed to pathogens but I can't imagine hydrating a chicken with bleach water. It won't cure anything they may have and could kill them.
    Whatever you decide on new birds, it is always a good thing to have alternative housing options for chickens. That can be used for quarantine of new birds, sick or injured birds and broody hens.
     
  3. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Crowing

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    Well not to long ago, I did read that washing a chickens feet in a diluted bleach water if coming from a different flock set up would help prevent the transmission of disease.
     
  4. PirateGirl

    PirateGirl Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist

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    In the right proportions bleach can safely be used to sterilize drinking water. I know backpackers that use this instead of iodine as it doesn't adversely effect the tast as much among other things. Bleach can safely be used to clean and disinfect food and water dishes for people and animals without leaving residue behind. I don't see the notion of using bleach as a red flag.

    I'm not sure that this practice would actually cure or prevent transmission of any disease a chicken is carrying however, it would only purify their drinking water. If you are giving them tap water to drink then this is totally unnecessary as our drinking water is pathogen free.

    What is a red flag is him saying they may come with a cold. This suggests he has had respiratory issues in his flock in the past and the birds may be carriers. Even if they aren't showing symptoms, these issues can resurface at time of stress like moving and flock integration.

    Whatever you decide, it is good to see the flock and their living conditions before committing. Trust your gut. If there are ANY birds that don't look healthy, walk away. Also wash your clothes when you get home and wear different shoes when you take care of your own flock.
     
    chickenmamakimberly likes this.
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    I would advise you to slow down....learn to care for and house the birds you have now.
    Which birds are cockerels?
    How big is your coop and run?
    Dimensions and some pics would help.
    Get an area in your coop set up to brood/integrate chicks,
    then either hatch some of your flock or buy day old chicks next spring.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2018
    sourland likes this.
  6. PirateGirl

    PirateGirl Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist

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    As much as you read online, the best teacher is experience and unexpected issues will come up with chicken keeping. Don't give up. Keep learning and adapting and perfecting your routine and your care and your setup. I think most chicken keepers continue to make changes and modifications eternally. Our work learning is never done. Sometime bad things happen to our flock that are out of our control. We can learn how to better prevent these things and we can learn how to better care for our birds when bad things happen. Here is my recent example. My birds got mites, bad. I could not have prevented this. I felt bad for their health. I have learned how to better check for and spot the issue sooner. I have learned how to effectively treat and cite the problem and improve the health of my flock. I have lost birds to health problems before as well and learned from those experience and overall my remaining flock and new birds that have been added over time are better off from my knowledge and the rough chicken keeping experiences I've had in the past. Stabilize your situation. Get back to a routine. When all is well you can consider adding a pair of birds to your flock.
     
    chickenmamakimberly likes this.
  7. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician

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    Do not buy from this person. Bleach might kill pathogens on feet, feathers, clothing, but will do nothing to control pathogens the birds may be carrying/shedding. Follow @aart's suggestions. Good luck in expanding your flock.
     
  8. Shadrach

    Shadrach Roosterist

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    I wouldn't buy chicks at all in your situation. I would wait and see if your hens will sit.
    I'm completely gobsmacked when I read about people 'getting' chickens from, as I understand it, stores and local breeders.
    Why take the risk?
    Every now and then I get a stray and they get quarantined. My quarantine isn't as stringent as it could be but for some problems I will at least get some warning.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2018
    chickenmamakimberly likes this.
  9. chickenmamakimberly

    chickenmamakimberly Chirping

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    I have an EE cockerel and a Polish Silkie cockerel. My I’m not sure of the dimensions of my coop. It has 4 nesting boxes and 4 roosting bars. My FIL built it. My run is 12 feet long and 5 feet wide. I just made it walk in. I have been securing it for the past few days. I’ll attach pics. The rush for me is the fact that I will only have 3 hens. I thought it would be easier to add when they are young verses when I have full grown roosters and broody hens.

    The run is finished now. This is an older photo.
     

    Attached Files:

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