double yolker and air sac ??s

tebs78

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I got another batch of seb goose eggs and there is a HUGE egg in there, not that goose eggs arent big enough. I candled it and I think it has two yolks. Is it pretty much a waste of time to incubate it? The gal didn't charge me for it because she figured it was a double yolker, but said I might want to experiment with it. hmmmm? And also when candling shipped eggs, how do you know if the air sac is burst?
 

pips&peeps

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Jan 18, 2008
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If the air sac is burst it will move around in the egg, so if you turn the egg upside down it will go which ever way is up. Like a level bubble will move for example.

I have a couple in the incubator that I am hatching for a friend that were burst and so far they are doing just fine. I have only succesfully hatched one though.
 
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twigg

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Mar 2, 2008
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I have a couple in the incubator that I am hatching for a friend that were burst and so far they are doing just fine.

Let us know if they hatch will you?

I've not heard of eggs hatching when the internal membrane has been broken so early, but that doesn't mean they won't.

The chick needs the airspace to stay at the large end of the egg, so upright in an autoturner sounds best.​
 

tebs78

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Jan 1, 2008
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since I am not 100% sure I see two yolks, I am still going to throw the egg into the bator... I will keep an eye on it. I have been trying to read up on that, and I only read ONCE that there has been such thing as a twin chicken. lol.

The air sacs "move" alittle but don't float up. I hope thats a good sign.

Thanks for the responses. Any body ever try to hatch a double yolker just for fun? Will it even start to develop or do they not develop at all?
 

hazelton farms

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Jan 4, 2008
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I have a couple different friends hatch out double yolkers. One had two chicks hatch and live just fine. The other had one chick pip, the other was already dead, so the pipped chick couldn't work it's way around the egg and finish hatching, so both died.

I won't put them in if I think they are double yolkers just because it seems almost cruel to know they probably won't make it but go ahead and start them anyway. But if you're doing it as a learning experience..then I guess I can understand the need to do it.


I've also heard that to hatch something with a loose air sac, you start out incubating it upside down for the first few days, then turn it right side up for the rest of the time like it's supposed to be. I've heard it works..but I don't know personally, as I've never tried it.


Stacy
 

tebs78

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Jan 1, 2008
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Maybe if they do PIP then I would just go ahead and help it out? Like a planned c-section so to speak? What can it hurt if its going to die if I DON"T help it out?
 

twigg

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I've also heard that to hatch something with a loose air sac, you start out incubating it upside down for the first few days, then turn it right side up for the rest of the time like it's supposed to be. I've heard it works..but I don't know personally, as I've never tried it.

I don't get the logic of this, maybe someone will come along and explain it


There is a point about double-yolk eggs that I was thinking about. The are effectively deformed eggs. Generally it's usual not to set eggs that are poorly shaped, thin shelled or too small or large, so it's maybe the same here.

I guess for experiment or interest it might be worthwhile, but I'll probably just be grateful, and eat any we get.​
 

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