Down side of two roosters in one flock

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Penton, Nov 13, 2013.

  1. Penton

    Penton Out Of The Brooder

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    New Question: How do two roosters effect a small backyard flock (six hens)? What do I do with roosters I didn't want? I was told I had to have a rooster to make my hens happy. Can't I just have happy hens without a rooster? I don't want fertilized eggs, just breakfast. Any ideas? Thanks for all the help!
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    There are lots of options and no one right way.
    I like having a rooster with a flock for several reasons: protection from predators, they tend to keep the peace, they find food for the girls and watch guard while they eat, a study showed pullets start laying earlier if a rooster is present.
    You don't need a rooster to have happy hens but after a rooster is taken away, the hens seem to be in a funk for a week or two.
    Two roosters with 6 hens is likely too many.
    Best option is to eat the least favorite or the one that is more human aggressive. Extra roosters taste just like chicken.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2013
  3. fried green eggs

    fried green eggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi & [​IMG]. You do not need a rooster to make your hens happy. They will lay quite well without having to deal with a rooster. With only 6 hens 2 roosters will stress them and cause them to lose back feathers and be over bred. Some feel that you should have a rooster to protect hens when they are out of pen to free range. And some roosters will do that.
    You can post on this site under the BUY SELL TRADE / Free Animals in need of re- homing or put a listing on Craigslist or have them go to freezer camp to eat them - you know you are not eating GMO fed birds.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2013
  4. Bogtown Chick

    Bogtown Chick Overrun With Chickens

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    Two Roosters in a flock that small will give you bareback hens from over mating. They mate in competition with each other. That's if they get along. If you still want to keep one: Look at the qualities of each. Is one nicer to you and the hens? that's the one to keep.

    I think it's neat personally to have a rooster and I can't imagine my flock with out one...but No... you do not need one. The girls will be happy without one too I'm sure. Many flocks of hens are fine with out a rooster. In fact some of those flocks will usually have a High Hen leading them. Although I'm thinking mine do like their male companionship. I have heard stories of hens that were getting older and quit laying. Then a roo was introduced to them and they seemed to enjoy him and began laying again. LOL. Kind of cute and makes you think about the happiness quotient.

    May I ask if you have all your birds in a coop all the time or are you on a parcel of land in which they can free range? If it is the latter I recommend keeping a rooster as they keep a look out for predators while your hens eat. Total value in that, alone.

    All that being said...I think you at least need to get down to one....and that guy you don't need if you don't want him, albeit they surely grace a flock and make it pretty and give it character.
     
  5. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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  6. DallasCriftins

    DallasCriftins Chillin' With My Peeps

    And 20+ Roasters in a flock is absolute mayhem but great fun :)

    You could always simply keep them separated as I do and I just let one or two out occasionally to run with the Hens in between eating them as spare Roasters are very tasty.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Except this chap he is so soppy and docile the other Roos chased him constantly in the Roo pen so he and his brother are in with the hens all the time

    [​IMG]
     
  7. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    If you just want eggs, didn't want roosters in the first place and only have that small number of hens, just get rid of the oops roosters. Advertise them on Craigslist or at your local feed store. Around here, unless they're something special, you pretty much have to give them away, but at least then you don't have to deal with them. Personally, I love roosters and have several I'm weeding through to see who to keep, but I don't believe they're for everyone and lots of small backyard flock just don't need one, let alone two.
     
  8. Penton

    Penton Out Of The Brooder

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    ChickenCanoe, thanks for the information. I think I'll simply give the extra rooster back. Do you think it's best to keep the bigger rooster or the smaller rooster? Any way to tell which would be better to keep?
     
  9. Penton

    Penton Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the reply. I was the told the hens "picked" the rooster and won't do well without the one. But the original rooster is still quite young (has only crowed once) and I'm not sure the hens are attached to him yet. The rooster which I originally was told was a hen, seems to be more aggressive with the flock.......not sure I like that, either. I think I will return the rooster (or maybe try to list him for sale). What's a fair price on a rooster?
     
  10. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    If you're positive you don't want replacement birds then it probably doesn't matter. If you might and you might want to eat the 50% cockerel chicks that emerge then the bigger roo may be the best choice.
     

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