Dr. Evil - How to gain some respect?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by gabbyscritters, Aug 1, 2011.

  1. gabbyscritters

    gabbyscritters Chillin' With My Peeps

    228
    2
    131
    Mar 28, 2009
    fredonia, wi
    I got a nasty rooster, need some advice, and the stew pot is not a answer!
    I have always told my 10 year old that we will never keep a naughty rooster. They get a new home, a 1 pound banty is not much for stewin.
    The banties are our daughters. She knew that getting the trio of adult Dutch she would be getting birds she could breed and hopefully show. That not all of her chickens would be her pets too, to get a quality bird sometimes meant getting a adult with possible temperment risks.

    Get ready to read the "tail" of Dr. Evil and how he got his name.

    However, we now have a nasty one, and paid good money for him to boot! Shipped in a tri of quality Dutch from a breeder, the roo was about 9 months old. We were told he was never really handled but had never shown any aggression, the breeder did admit he did bite her when she put him into the shipping box.

    At the time I thought, well he was scared and thats why he bit. When he arrived we kept him in single cage without the hens for awhile, breeders recomdation. He was very scared but once caught did not try to fight when he was held. This "sweet" stage did not last long, first he started to bite when held so I would hold him where he could not get me. Then he moved onto being aggressive as soon as the door to cage opened. I got hubby involved as I did not want him knowing he could get the better of us, I could not even open the door to change his water.

    We thought that he would be happier in more space and with some ladies. His feathers had much cage wear so I am sure he never had much space. We let him have a 4x6 breeder pen with 6' height. He loved having ladies and high perches. However, he got even nastier. Now he was not only protective of his house but also his ladies!

    There was no way to even enter the cage during the day, he would be flying and flapping ready to bite and hang on for dear life. Hubby, who is a leather worker, made a leather arm guard just like to a falcon, so that he could handle Dr. Evil without being bit up. The more you tri to avoid the beak the more he was determined to get you and he bites hard and hangs on.

    Trying to take a different approach on roosters, we did not try the typical naughty rooster tricks, holding him upside down, chasing him, ect.
    Hubby would go into his pen at least once a day and catch the little devil and hold him quietly, stroking him, when and only when he quit squirming he would set him down.
    He finally figured out that it was not too much fun biting the leather, but if you had bear arm and hand that was different.

    During all this time I would bring him and his ladies green treats from the yard, he loves it and is very good about sharing with his girls. He finally figured out that treats were worth having his door opened part way for as long as I did not dare cross the pen threshold with my foot. The flying and thrashing would begin then.

    By now Dr. Evil and his girls also have a small outside pen, this is the best life he has had and yet he is a little 1 pound stinker!

    I have finally gotten sick of not being able to enter the cage to feed, water, collect his girls eggs without a major commotion. I have braved it and enter without hesitation, face the thrashing and do my chicken thing. He actually does not really do anything but leave a few scratches. I even do it now in shorts and flip flops but it is really annoying, I mean come on I am the one bringing you food.

    His nature I think is not aggressive, he is kind to his girls. We have 6 Dutch cockerals and Pullets which have several times ventured into his pen while I was rooster battling. The first time I thought, oh my gosh there is going to be a blood bath with the 3 month old cock. He did not do anything, and let the little intruders share his clovers.

    So any ideas of gaining some respect from this little stinker?
    Were not looking at him being a safe roo for our daughter to play with but would like for him to not attack a judge at a show and it would be reall nice to enter his house without being having your ankles attacked!
     
  2. CityGirlintheCountry

    CityGirlintheCountry Green Eggs and Hamlet

    6,950
    73
    311
    Jul 7, 2007
    Middle TN
    Personally, I have never been able to turn an agressive rooster into a sweet rooster. I had a mille fleur d'uccle rooster (bantam) who was positively hateful. He got to where he was drawing blood everytime I went in the pen. I got rid of him.

    If you are using him to breed, remember that personality is inheirited. If he is hateful, his offspring will likely be hateful. Why would you want to breed that into your line? There are entirely too many roosters out there to put up with a hateful one. Explain it to your daughter in kid-friendly terms and move him on.
     
  3. gabbyscritters

    gabbyscritters Chillin' With My Peeps

    228
    2
    131
    Mar 28, 2009
    fredonia, wi
    Yes, the temperment being passed on has been a concern. We are planning on breeding him and see what we get.
    We did also pick up the 2 young Dutch cockerals last month. Drove half way across the county with them, brought them back from our vacation in Montana. We already figured that we might be selling Dr. Evil in the future, still hope there is hope to turn him around into a rooster for at least the next person.

    The lines of the Montana breeder are the from the same imported Dutch lines as Dr. Evil, I think most of it has been lack of handling and now he a one year old jerk.
     
  4. CityGirlintheCountry

    CityGirlintheCountry Green Eggs and Hamlet

    6,950
    73
    311
    Jul 7, 2007
    Middle TN
    I don't handle my roosters except to prove to them that I am the alpha rooster. The ones that I handled a lot turned into rotten adult roos. The boys that I have in my breeding pens are properly scared of me and do NOT challenge me. They still take very good care of their girls, but I don't have to worry about them taking a chunk out of me!

    Roosters are no different from bulls or billy goats or rams. They are just smaller bundles of testosterone. The rooster that is a lap chicken is very, very rare. Most are not. I have NEVER had a lap rooster, even with my silkies. That is just not how they are made. Trying to make them pets or lap animals does them and you a disservice. Love all over the hens. Let your daughter pet them and love all over them. Use the roosters for breeding and treat them like you would a bull.

    Choosing what you are breeding for is very important. Breeding for color and form is awesome, but if you are churning out hateful or unruly animals does no one a good turn. Personality is the third prong for me and truthfully tends to be the most important prong in my book.
     
  5. pgpoultry

    pgpoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,291
    18
    191
    Oct 16, 2009
    Wales
    I handle all 5 of my roos regularly and none are remotely aggressive to people, though they 'wing dance' and chase each other off and have a strict pecking/mating order.

    I DO believe, though, that they have to learn who is boss, and a couple tried 'wing dancing' me in their adolescence. I grabbed them and walked around with them under my arm in front of the others a couple of times and that cured the problem.

    I also have 5 huge rams and 4 out of the 5 are absolute sweethearts....vast gentle giants who are totally trustworthy. My fifth ram, however, is not to be trusted, is a much smaller breed than the 4 gentle boys, and you should never have your back turned on him or he may head butt......know as Ifor the A***hole for just this reason!

    A lot depends on the breed and the personality of the roo. I had a mutt roo some years ago, largely RIR, who would try to re-establish himself as head of the flock from time to time. I did not keep him.
     
  6. allpeepedout

    allpeepedout Chillin' With My Peeps

    519
    17
    131
    Mar 2, 2011
    Southern Indiana
    I just have experience with one roo, very much a pet chick, and the rooster-training techniques on BYC worked for me when the hormones kicked in and he turned agressive. However, once behavior becomes a habitual pattern, you have a much tougher task that would require daily work for quite as long as it takes. I believe change is always possible. If you change, he will also (for better or worse). The technique of pushing the rooster down on the ground, on his back and neck, until he relaxes made quite an impression on mine, as well as hanging upside down, being picked up, being stalked a little bit.

    Sounds like there is a market for rooster reform school! Best to nip in bud when it starts, methinks.
     
  7. mikensara

    mikensara Chillin' With My Peeps

    425
    0
    99
    Jun 16, 2011
    New York
    I wouldnt keep him personally if you cant do the deed yourself find someone else to put him on the dinner table. So far so good with our roo hes fairly friendly and doesnt mind us being around his ladies.
     
  8. CityGirlintheCountry

    CityGirlintheCountry Green Eggs and Hamlet

    6,950
    73
    311
    Jul 7, 2007
    Middle TN
    I guess I should clarify. I do not handle my roosters like pets. When they are adolescents I do pick them up and hold them just to prove to them that I am in charge. The hold to the ground trick worked on some of my silkie roos when they got fiesty. I have never successfully used any of the tricks on roosters that were already aggressive. In my experience once they go mean, they pretty much just get worse.
     
  9. ChickenAlgebra

    ChickenAlgebra Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 14, 2011
    THAT aggressive of a roo does NOT get to be used for breeding or to be kept as a pet. Stewpot is the only place for that horrid of a rooster.

    They don't have to be fawning, devoted pets. But they MUST let you take care of the coop, feed and water and NEVER attack a person!

    Any cocks from him are going to be just as rotten and worthless.

    Stewpot. 1lb bantam at least makes the start of a stock.
     
  10. Chickybaby

    Chickybaby Out Of The Brooder

    97
    0
    39
    Mar 28, 2008
    NC - paradise!
    Sorry to say, but there's only one way to deal with a mean rooster - and the sooner the better in my opinion. I've only had one, and we've had many, but I can say there was no way to "fix" our meanie. I tried everything, and the more I tried the meaner he got. He was an EE, and the most beautiful thing I ever saw. We raised him from a few days old, along with the others and handled them all alot from the beginning - our neighbor teases us that we don't have chickens, we have TOYS! This one didn't start out mean, but never was friendly like the others. At about a year old, he started chasing the kids (our son and his friends, or the grandkids - they're all close in age) which was fun to them until Max started flying into their faces. He got one kid in the lip... so there was no more kids near the barn unless there was an adult there to watch. Then Max started stalking ME... hiding befind trees or under the truck, and coming after me if I wasn't looking. I always had a stick or something in my hand - the more I challenged him, the harder he came back at me! He was soooo pretty that I didn't want to hurt him, I just wanted it to stop, but it never did. It got worse. Finally he chased me from the barn to the front pasture while a had my hands full of hay for the horses, and that was IT for him. He was serious about puttin' a hurt on something that day! My husband wrung his neck and threw him on the manure pile one night (I didn't even want him in the freezer - just GONE) Relieved, I slept pretty well... but in the morning, guess who was waiting for me in the road when I was taking my son to school - yeah, it was Max! Stupid thing would not DIE! So, I got the .22 pistol and shot him. I know I got him, he staggered out to the pasutre and fell over. Finally, the nasty thing was GONE! So I went into the barn to clean stalls, figuring I would dispose of him when I got done. Yeah, NO! While I was in the barn, he got up and disappeared for several days! I never thought of a roo as EVIL, but this one WAS! I finally found him, dead, in the barn later in the week. All I can say is if a roo, even a REALLY pretty one, comes after someone and you don't (or can't) stop it after a couple of attempts, do what you gotta do! There are those few that can't be "fixed" and someone's gonna get hurt.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by