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Draining chickens abdomen and getting green-tinged fluid

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by crysi727, Sep 16, 2016.

  1. crysi727

    crysi727 New Egg

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    Mar 20, 2013
    Spencer, Massachusetts
    I have a 4 year old Rhode Island hen who has been "sick" for a few months. My husband and I have been draining fluid from her abdomen every 2-3 weeks. Up until now it has been clear/light yellow. Last night the color I drained out was green-tinged. We drain her under sterile conditions, keep her in overnight and liberally apply anti tic ointment before she goes back "home" with her sisters. I'm pretty sure she didn't pick up an infection from the draining.

    She is eating and drinking fine, is happily running around with the rest of her flock and is generally acting like herself. She has no fever. When I palpitate her abdomen I feel what seems like a floating object. I want to say it could be an egg, but I'm not positive. We have no chicken vets in the area so that's (unfortunately) an option.

    What could the change in color indicate? I do have a Tractor Supply a few towns over, if there is anything we would need, I'm sure I could buy it there.

    So far, we haven't been overly worried about our Lucy, but now with the change in fluid color were becoming more and more concerned. Any advice/information would be GREATLY appreciated. We don't eat our chickens and they're like family members to us.

    Crysi
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Just my thoughts, but if the fluid you are draining from the abdomen has taken on a green color, then most likely advanced infection is setting in.

    I would assume that since you've been giving supportive care (draining the abdomen) for a few months, that she has Ascites, Egg Yolk Peritonitis or something similar. You could try antibiotic treatment, but usually this is not effective.

    If you have vet care available, then that would be best.
     
  3. crysi727

    crysi727 New Egg

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    Mar 20, 2013
    Spencer, Massachusetts
    I've called every vet, 4H and co-op in the area. Nobody takes chickens [​IMG]

    I do nursing so I was pretty sure it was ascites and possibly an infection. My other thought is maybe I got the intentional system instead?

    We have her out with her sisters and she hasn't showed any signs of decompensation so far. I'll go up to put local farm store and inquire about antibiotic therapy. I'm willing to try anything until I know it's her time.

    Thank you for responding, I appreciate it ! Crysi
     
  4. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    Your local feed store should have some type of antibiotics.
     
  5. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    I am as yet unsure of the ramifications but you may wish to stock up on antibiotics for your animals use. I saw a small snippet in the paper that soon only your vet will be able to write prescriptions for animal antibiotics. This will likely result in you having to

    carry any sick animal to the veterinarian for both examination, lab testing, and evaluation before you are allowed to purchase life saving medicine for your critters.


    It would be a good idea for someone else to confirm this governmental overreach. Don't take my Right Wing Nut Job, Basket Full of Deplorables word for it. Research it and learn the truth for yourself then share the news with the rest of us..
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. crysi727

    crysi727 New Egg

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    Mar 20, 2013
    Spencer, Massachusetts
    I'm taking your advice, thank you [​IMG] I'm going to my local farm store and stocking up. We have no vets within a 25 mile radius that takes chickens. It's sad that with so many people raising flocks that there Arent more vets to help them when they get sick. I'll do research, completely unbiased if I can find it, and share it .Thank you for responding to my post, I truly appreciate it [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  7. 3feathers

    3feathers Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 2, 2014
    I had a chicken with water belly (ascites) which this sounds like. Yellow fluid and all. Good article on it : http://www.thepamperedpulletsfarm.com/Water_Belly.html
    First guess would be a nick to a digestive wall from the needle that let contamination into the body cavity. The fluid is protein rich and would be very good breeding ground. Smell the fluid for that "infection smell" see if it smelled different from the previous fluid. The fluid I removed had a very distinctive smell.
     

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