Dripping Noses, no other symptoms - respiratory?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by lelisabeth, Jul 13, 2009.

  1. lelisabeth

    lelisabeth Songster

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    Apr 20, 2009
    Elverson, Pennsylvania
    My chicks (20 weeks old) have had dripping noses for over a week now. No other symptoms that I know of. This is my first time with chicks, and I am still learning a lot, is there anything else to look for, or anything I can do to prevent illness? Is a drippy nose a bad thing, or can it be normal? I notice it when I am feeding them by hand and they are pecking. I'll get little drips on my hand, brown from dust I guess.

    Actually, now that I think of it, there may be another symptom. They have diarrea looking poop that really stinks. Wasn't always like that, today was the first time I saw it, and 3 of the four had it. I put ACV in their water about twice a week, but that's all that I've done so far.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2009
  2. threehorses

    threehorses Songster

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    It could be viral, fungal, bacterial, or a nutritional deficiency like vitamin A deficiency. Until you see more symptoms (not including diarrhea - see below), I'd support their immunity, boost their nutrition, and do some prevention things and hope if it IS something that they will fight it and develop an immunity. Antibiotics won't prevent birds from becoming carriers, but they can be harsh on a bird and also their digestive tract.

    I'd eliminate the possibility of environmental causes - like mildew in the bedding, musty air, etc. Get them in the sunshine (carefully because of the heat) and fresh air. Clean all the waterers, etc, just in case.

    Make sure they're eating grower or grower feed transitioning into laying feed if their combs are starting to fill out and turn red. Make sure now that they have oyster shell available to start building their calcium.

    Give them yogurt daily this week to help with the diarrhea. Likely, the diarrhea is from the nose drainage as the nose drains into the mouth and thus into the digestive tract. That fluid (and possible bacteria in it) changes the pH and bacterial health of the gut, straining the good bacteria which usually keep things healthy. Giving live bacteria daily will rebuild the healthy bacterial loads, which in turn fight small bits of bad bacteria.

    So daily plain yogurt (1T each bird daily for a week), or acidophilis capsules/tablets - their powder of 1 per bird daily/week, or even a live bacteria probiotic for livestock like Probios powder.

    Then watch for additional symptoms and let us know if anything changes.

    Oh and the diarrhea - if it's one dropping every few droppings, pudding like consistency or more loose, and very smellly it's possible that it's just the cecum clearing out as it does every few droppings. It's horrible smelling, but if it's a few during the day with the rest normal, that's ok.
     
  3. lelisabeth

    lelisabeth Songster

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    Apr 20, 2009
    Elverson, Pennsylvania
    I agree, I don't want to use antibiotics as a preventative (I was told to do this previously). Their coop is clean, and has ventilation, so I think I am good there. It is completely covered, including the integrated run, so no standing water or moisture problems. I let them out for about 1 hour every day, but other than that they don't get in the sun much, except indirectly in the morning and afternoon when it shines in the east and west sides. The coop is on the north wall of my garage, so it gets only east and west sun.

    So, I will buy plain yogurt for them tonight, which should boost their immune system, correct? I have greek yogurt, which is supposed to be better for people, but I don't know about chickens. I know it has 3 times the amount of protein, is that better for them? Also, it is fruit yogurt, not plain. I'll get the plain, if that is better. I have transitioned them to layer feed already, because I introduced a full grown hen about 2 weeks ago. One of them has a bright red comb, and big waddles, the other two don't. They are wyandottes, so I don't know why the one has such a red comb when they are all the same age.

    You're right, the diarrhea is probably the cecum, I looked up pictures and that's what it looked like. Just made me nervous that they all had it at the same time yesterday, but probably because I was feeding them treats all at the same time. I'll keep watching. Thank you so much for your help!!
     
  4. threehorses

    threehorses Songster

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    Apr 20, 2009
    Houston
    The smell was the kicker! I figured you did what I did once: notice that dropping, and then start seeing them everywhere. Once you notice them, you can't UNnotice them. I'm betting that's what they are. But just in case, the yogurt boosts their natural beneficial bacteria of the gut if you give it in light dosages.

    The good bacteria colonize the gut. Their mechanism is to literally compete with bad bacteria, fungus, and other pathogens for the same... real estate. [​IMG] They also secrete some enzymes that are said to keep pathogenic bacteria more in control.

    Sometimes, during stress (which includes ramping up to lay eggs), the bacterial numbers will drop off and then a little war begins with bad bacteria trying to take over, etc. The droppings will become more loose. I always hedge my bets during those times and offer some sort of probiotic. Yogurt just tends to be the handiest for most people to start with. And greek is fine (and delicious)! I'm jealous as it's tough to get that here without a good drive.

    Other probiotic choices are a prepared probiotic for livestock or birds. I like Probios brand dispersible powder if you can find a smaller $9 bottle. It keeps well in the fridge and sometimes is easier to get the birds to accept (or sneak to them) at 1/4 teaspoon a dose per bird. Acidophilis capsules or tablets also work. Either empty the capsule or crush the tablet into powder. Then you mix that with a little something they'll eat quickly, or put in a bit of bread if they'll eat that quickly. So those are some options, and just in case someone else reads this thread and needs the information.

    Let us know how they do, please? [​IMG] Thanks!
     

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