dry or wet incubating witch one better

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by DownSouthOrps, Feb 15, 2014.

  1. DownSouthOrps

    DownSouthOrps Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 13, 2014
    Dry or wet
     
  2. Farmer Viola

    Farmer Viola Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Earth
    I highly recommend the dry incubation method; there is a link to read about it in my signature.
     
  3. DownSouthOrps

    DownSouthOrps Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 13, 2014
    Even at hatch time
     
  4. Farmer Viola

    Farmer Viola Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Earth
    read the link
     
  5. DownSouthOrps

    DownSouthOrps Out Of The Brooder

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    What link I am on mobile
     
  6. TheChickInn

    TheChickInn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    After having several batches of chicks "drown" right at hatching time a few years ago....I prefer to dry incubate. I have had very good luck with keeping humidity right about 35% for the first 18 days, then I increase it to 50% when I take the eggs out of the turner ( days 18-20). I crank up the humidity to 70% when I see the first pip. I think a lot depends on what kind of incubator you use. I have a King Suro and a Brinsea. I had terrible luck at hatching with my Styrofoam incubator, so now just use that one for an extra "hatching incubator" if I have a staggered hatch.
     
  7. DownSouthOrps

    DownSouthOrps Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a dicky
     
  8. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm not a fan of the term "dry" Incubating. To achieve 35-40% humidity relative to 99.5F well, that's not exactly "dry" is it? I have to add water to achieve that. No water or incubating dry in my home of 60% humidity results in 25% in incubator. I think we all agree that's too low. Incubating in humid summers or you live in a humid environment may result in dry incubating- not adding any water at all during first 18 days of incubation, but that's not the case for the majority of people. I run a humidifier in winter heating months to achieve 60% humidity in the room.

    I do incubate at lower humidity than some but never dry. 35-40% first 18 days. 55-60% during hatch.
     
  9. A roo or two

    A roo or two Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 16, 2013
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    I am trying your method right now. This is my first incubation ever and just prior to getting ready to set my eggs I found your link. I can't wait to see how things turn out. So far looking pretty good, candled yesterday at day 7. 2 clears, 1 early quitter and 34 that looked good.

    Keeping my humidity as close to 30 as I can, fluctuates a little here in FL, not cool enough for heat or hot enough for air to help dry out the house any.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2014

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