Dry, pale combs with HOLES. Help!!

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by ascorsonelli, Oct 25, 2013.

  1. ascorsonelli

    ascorsonelli New Egg

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    Mar 28, 2013
    Pineywoods of East Texas
    I have 2 leghorns and 1 bantam buff Orpington. They're all 7 months old and have been with us since chicks.

    Until recently, they each produced about an egg a day. Within the last two weeks, both leghorns have stopped laying.

    I've noticed one of the leghorns and the orpington's combs are paler and have shrunken. The other leghorn's comb is pale and has white spots and HOLES in it! [​IMG]

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Haven't had much luck looking online. I realize combs will go pale when they're not laying. I've only seen a few loose feathers around, and besides, aren't they too young for their first molt?!

    PLEASE HELP!
     
  2. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Jul 24, 2013
    It looks like they have dry Fowl Pox. Fowl Pox is a viral disease of chickens, most often spread by mosquitoes and flying insects (but also through the water, I believe). Fowl Pox causes scabs and lesions on the comb. It isn't usually dangerous, unless it progresses to the wet form, which causes scabs and lesions in the throat. Fowl pox should go away on its own in a few weeks.

    To help your birds, give them some electrolytes and probiotics to get over stress. You might also want to give antibiotics, as though Fowl Pox is viral(and therefore won't be treated by antibiotics), a secondary bacterial disease can affect your birds because they are under the stress of Fowl Pox. Put some iodine on the scabs and lesions to help them go away.

    If your birds get the wet form, they may have trouble breathing. They often also have yellow cheesy material in their throat/beak. Sometimes, they will not eat because it is painful/difficult. If so, you may want to think about tube feeding. However, right now, your birds appear to only have dry Fowl Pox.

    There is a vaccine available to Fowl Pox, so if it becomes common in your area, you may want to vaccinate.
     
  3. ascorsonelli

    ascorsonelli New Egg

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    Mar 28, 2013
    Pineywoods of East Texas
    Thank you so much @Wyandottes7! That's what a local backyard chicken owner said too. Makes sense considering we have mosquitos around ALL the time. Haven't noticed any wheezing, so hopefully it won't progress to wet pox. Think it's worth vaccinating the orp who's still laying? How much does that usually cost??
     
  4. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    I don't think that it would be very beneficial to vaccinate just the bird that is laying. Vaccines usually come in 1,000 dose bottles, and vaccinating just one bird wouldn't be very cost effective. If you decide that you want to, here is a link to the vaccine: http://www.twincitypoultrysupplies....in_page=product_info&cPath=46&products_id=567
     

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