Dual purpose breeds

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by FrontPorchIndiana, May 15, 2008.

  1. FrontPorchIndiana

    FrontPorchIndiana Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 8, 2008
    Indiana
    How old do most dual purpose breeds need to be before butchering?
     
  2. AussieSharon

    AussieSharon Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 18, 2007
    Virginia
    Some breeds mature faster than others like Barred Rocks, dorkings and New Hampshire Reds but I'd say on average for a dual purpose bird to get to a decent buterching size, 4 to 5 months
     
  3. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

    4,889
    16
    261
    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    15+ weeks. Don't expect too much out of them. "Dual Purpose" means "meatier than a Leghorn". So, don't expect anything as satisfying as a broiler
     
  4. morelcabin

    morelcabin Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 8, 2007
    Ontario Canada
    Sorry to jump in here but I would like to add my own 'dual purpose' question:)

    If you butcher at 'end of lay' instead of the 18-24 week mark, do you end up with a tough old bird, or are they still good eating?
     
  5. FrontPorchIndiana

    FrontPorchIndiana Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 8, 2008
    Indiana
    Quote:Yeah, I figured that. I was just trying to think of a plan to use the extra roos if I continue my incubation addiction.
     
  6. AussieSharon

    AussieSharon Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 18, 2007
    Virginia
    Quote:They are still good to eat but depending on how old they are when butchered they may make a better soup.
     
  7. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

    4,889
    16
    261
    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    Quote:A hen can lay 10+ years. But, they do get rather non-conventional looking under the feathers. Your best bet is to make stock, soups or stews.
     
  8. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

    4,889
    16
    261
    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    Quote:I only do this with hybrids. As far as purebreeds, I can fetch about $5-8 each at auction assuming I raise them to the 8 week mark. I can then use the $5-$8 to buy proper broiler chicks and have a better all around experience.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Carolina Chicken Man

    Carolina Chicken Man Chillin' With My Peeps

    229
    3
    134
    Mar 29, 2008
    Raleigh, NC
    Quote:I only do this with hybrids. As far as purebreeds, I can fetch about $5-8 each at auction assuming I raise them to the 8 week mark. I can then use the $5-$8 to buy proper broiler chicks and have a better all around experience.

    [​IMG]

    I found a weekly small animal auction near my house. Chickens, quail, pheasants, rabbits, turkeys etc. The majority of what was sold was chickens. People were selling layed out hens, chicks, and extra roosters. The highest price paid for a single chicken was $10 for a brahma rooster, real nice bird. A couple of Buff Orpington roosters went for $6 ea.

    I have to admit I did not understand the motivation of the people paying $2 for a layed out hen. I wondered if they knew what they were getting. Or, were the people that bid a $1 looking a cheap chicken for soop. I saw one guy pay $1 ea for 15 sex link chicks.
    Since they were sex links, I wondered if the seller was getting rid of all cockeriels. Did they buyer know what he was getting? He was hispanic. My wife and I discusse if he worked at a hog or chicken farm and could bring home a pound of free feed a day, and was just going to eat them.
     
  10. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

    4,889
    16
    261
    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    Most the bidders at the auction I go to are immigrant-types and are buying them as a food source. In pretty much the rest of the world, roosters are eaten quite regulalry. Apparently once you're used to rooster meat, you can't go back to a broiler. And apparently you cannot make a proper tamale using a broiler hybrid.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by