Dual Purpose

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Leah and peeps, May 11, 2011.

  1. Leah and peeps

    Leah and peeps Chillin' With My Peeps

    463
    1
    121
    Jun 28, 2009
    Canada
    What are some of the DP breeds that you have used for meat? What have your experiences been and how have they dressed out?

    I m looking more, and more into getting some birds for the table (these would be my first meaties) , but I don't know what breed to get. I am kind of worried about getting the CC becasue of the problems that they can have and all the "horror" stories that I have heard about them. I am also really interested in the Coloured Broilers but where I am located there are not a lot of hatcheries that sell them. So I am now looking into the DP. Picture would be appriciated. Thanks for your help![​IMG]
    Leah
     
  2. bookerdog

    bookerdog Chillin' With My Peeps

    167
    0
    99
    Mar 21, 2011
    Oregon
    Some good heritage Delawares would be my choice.
     
  3. BooBear

    BooBear Chicken Cuddler

    2,435
    15
    171
    Oct 7, 2010
    Conroe, Texas
    Wyandottes make a yummy meal.
    Their breasts are not wide like the cornishes, but still plenty of meat. Legs and thighs are really big compared to store bought and darker in color. We ate the extra boys already.

    Didn't take pictures of the carcass dressed out though.
     
  4. Doctim

    Doctim Out Of The Brooder

    92
    0
    29
    Aug 24, 2010
    North of Dallas, Texas
    My Marans were very tasty as well, though my beautiful wife thought they looked more like rabbits after they were dressed out.
    Tim
     
  5. wekiva bird

    wekiva bird Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,139
    21
    183
    Mar 18, 2010
    South Carolina
    BO Non hatchery and Heritage Delaware are tasty.
     
  6. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

    delete
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2011
  7. jenkassai

    jenkassai Chillin' With My Peeps

    279
    2
    111
    Apr 28, 2011
    So glad I came across this thread! I am a first-time chicken owner, getting my chicks 5/31. When telling a "foodie" friend about my new passion, she and her husband asked if I would raise a rooster for them specifically to use for Coq Au Vin. I am interested and told them I would look into it. Our birds are going to be for eggs only, we don't plan on eating them, but I think all the breeds I chose are Dual Purpose, and if I do raise a rooster I would like it to be one of the breeds I selected in case they don't take it or whatever. So my question is, if I DO raise a rooster for them, do I need to feed it a separate ration? Can I just feed it the stuff I will be feeding my "layers"? I am LOVING learning all about chickens [​IMG]

    Thx!
     
  8. wood&feathers

    wood&feathers Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,018
    22
    178
    Dec 22, 2009
    E. KY
    So far we have processed Cornish x, Easter eggers, Rock/RIR mutts, Rock/Orp mutts, and one Marans. The Cornish isn't worth the bother, pretty much what you get at the grocery - might have more flavor if you restrict feed and try to prod them into foraging. All the rest were quite satisfactory. If you wish to bake or fry, use younger cockerels (whenever they start to crow). If you want chicken and dumplings or soup like you wouldn't believe, let them mature. My son was so excited the first time we had chicken and dumplings with a surplus rooster he said it tasted as good as snapping turtle. Considering that is his favorite winter meal, high praise indeed.

    From a culinary perspective, the speed with which Cornish x chickens mature does not provide the strength of bone and connective tissue that makes a superior broth. Thus great for tender frying, lousy for chicken and dumplings.
     
  9. brandislee

    brandislee Chillin' With My Peeps

    510
    13
    133
    Feb 15, 2011
    Southern Minnesota
    wood&feathers :

    From a culinary perspective, the speed with which Cornish x chickens mature does not provide the strength of bone and connective tissue that makes a superior broth. Thus great for tender frying, lousy for chicken and dumplings.

    I'll definitely consider this next time- broth is one of my top priorities. As it is, I have Cornish right now. How long do they have to mature before the bones and connective tissue are good for stock? Can anyone recommend a bird that would have good stock and still good meat?

    I thought that coq a vin was typically done with older, tougher meat, like an old laying hen. I think that's the original purpose of the recipe, anyway- long, slow cooking in wine to improve the flavor and texture of an otherwise tough old bird.​
     
  10. jenkassai

    jenkassai Chillin' With My Peeps

    279
    2
    111
    Apr 28, 2011
    Quote:I did mention to my friend that I thought an old hen might work because the meat was supposed to be tougher, but in reading some of the other threads on BYC, it sounds like the original/traditional recipe did call for a rooster. Might be moot since hubby is not thrilled with the idea of chickens, and says absolutely no rooster for now anyways! I figure get some here, he'll get attached and then maybe down the road I can get a rooster. Not sure how I'll feel about turning over an older girl when I know what they are going to do, and I know hubby will balk at it. Don't have that real farmer mentality, at least not yet [​IMG] OTOH, I DO like the idea of knowing that the animal I'm eating has had a relatively happy and healthy life and can appreciate what it's giving me. Guess we'll see!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by