Duck eggs at a farmers market?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by DUCKGIRL89, Dec 5, 2011.

  1. DUCKGIRL89

    DUCKGIRL89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do any of you guys sell duck eggs at a super market? Can you sell them there for eating AND hatching? Or just eating? Also how much would.you sell a dozen of eating eggs for? Is $3 to much?

    PS: my ducks lay HUGE eggs!

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. fisharescary

    fisharescary Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Around here (SC), $3 a doz would be very fair for huge duck eggs, but local markets vary by price. Back in WA I'm pretty sure people sold duck eggs for $6 a dozen in Seattle farmers' markets. That's all I can help with, unfortunately, as I've never sold eggs myself.
     
  3. DUCKGIRL89

    DUCKGIRL89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Ok thanks. If I sold 5 dozen a week to friends a stuff, that would cover the feed bill times three, so im hopeing I get a few costumers at church! And maybe even at a farmers markeg. Id really RELLY like to make my money back on the ducks, cause they really arent cheap. Lol. Thanks again!
     
  4. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    In our state, the Department of Agriculture has guidelines for selling eggs. I spoke to them. Some of their requirements are that cartons have a warning statement on them to the effect that you need to keep the eggs refrigerated. There's even a document online that tells the egg seller how to handle the eggs prior to sale.

    Market masters here must inspect coolers with eggs. Coolers must have a thermometer inside that can be read immediately upon opening them and the temperature can be no warmer than 45F, if I recall correctly. There is a fee for having a booth at the market. Sometimes people share a booth.

    I thought it would be fun to sell eggs at the market, too, and I might some day, but between neighbors, friends and family, we're doing fine distributing the "wealth." Yes, ducks can incur some expenses. So finding a way to cover or at least reduce them is a good idea.

    Some of my friends bring food for my ducks. That helps!
     
  5. DUCKGIRL89

    DUCKGIRL89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Amiga I knew you would chime in at some point [​IMG] and thanks for the advice! [​IMG]

    I have a few people at church asking people for eggs, but I dont have any. But if all my hens are good lqyers I will be getting a half a dozen a week. This isnt counting htching eggs though.... I have A TON of people wanting ducklings and eggs, and just selling these ducklings to people and selling hatching eggs covers all my ducks winter feeding for next year! Now just to cover summer and fall [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2011
  6. RAREROO

    RAREROO Overrun With Chickens

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    Yep if you can geet enough customers you can personally selly to that would be best, since most farmers/flea markets charge a fee ( it cost $10 to set up and sell items at the flea market section of the livestock auction here) so you have to have enough to sell to make it worth while if you did it that way. But if you can find enough customers, I have found that laying flock can pay for THEIR own feed when the eggs are sold. But the reason I stress "their" is because if you are like me whenen I was growing off lots of birds to sell, and they aren't laying yet and giving anything back until you sell them, then oviously the flock of layers can produce enough to pay for everyones feed and that's when you start building up an ugly bill.

    If you plan on hatching though, especially in the spring months and around easter, ducklings sell really well if you want to sell them, or depending on your feedstore people, you may be able to see if they would like to sell some on consignment where you take them the ducklings and tell them how much you want for them, then they sell them higher than that, and keep the extra and give you back what you wanted for them and keep their commision. I've done that before and it works nicely, that way the feedstore is more willing to do it rather than buying the ducklings up front taking a chance on them not selling, and plus they get to sell feed to whoever buys the ducklings which is the real reason feedstores sell chicks and ducks anyway. That that can be a way for you to hatch and sell without growing them off.
     
  7. DUCKGIRL89

    DUCKGIRL89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    RR: ive talked to the feed store I get my feed from and they said they would rather just buy the ducklings. So I will be hatching around 10 to 12 ducklings for them, and sell the ducklings cheap since they want more then three [​IMG] I was think somewhere arounds $3 a peice? That gives me some money. And thats how much they bought their other ones for last year, and they dont need to pay shipping since I live ten minutes away [​IMG] so if I sell a dozen ducklings to them for $3 each then thats 36$ thats pretty good.... Right?
     
  8. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    That sounds like a great opportunity. Are feed stores are not that nice.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2011
  9. DUCKGIRL89

    DUCKGIRL89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:well they bought them for that much from a hatchery. And sold them for $5.
     
  10. DUCKGIRL89

    DUCKGIRL89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I thought so to.
     

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