Duck eggs, when to mist?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Rainstorm, Nov 23, 2009.

  1. Rainstorm

    Rainstorm Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 25, 2009
    Lake Placid FLorida
    Just started my new incubation of 1 1/2 dozen muscovys and half dozen mutt duck eggs 8 silkie eggs and 6 easter egger eggs on saturday, I was told to get a better hatch rate I could Mist the duck eggs. When do I start this? right from beginning of incubation or I read somewhere after day 10?

    also.. I have 1 bantam egg in there that was a Test for fertility I put about 2 weeks ago in there and by the time I checked it was moving and didnt want to take it out.. its still alive and really active from what I can see, It should be due this coming thursday or friday. If I let it hatch in the incubator and its successfull without a full boost of humidity, Will that one egg cause bacteria to grow by the time my ducks and silkies hatch and kill them? Will it be alright to let it stay in?

    also temperature problem!!!! I have 2 of the temp/hum therms from walmarts thats about $6 each in the incubataor. side my side toward the top practically under the lil knob it claims 100.8 on one and 102.0 on the other. Who do I listen to??? How do i know which is right? and if i put them down on the egg racks it says like 98.8 or 99.7 in some places, I have a LG. does it make THAT big a difference between places of less then a inch of height?
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2009
  2. Rainstorm

    Rainstorm Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 25, 2009
    Lake Placid FLorida
    Anyone?
     
  3. skillet_scramble

    skillet_scramble Out Of The Brooder

    31
    0
    22
    Nov 18, 2009
    SE Texas or Angola
    Quote:Just wondering, is this a still air incubator or does it have a fan? The differences that you experience sound like a still air unit to me, if so then you will want the optimum temperature at the height of the top of the eggs not close to the thermostat or heating element. It is very critical to maintain the correct temperature at the level of the eggs. With a forced air unit usually the differences are much less.
     
  4. Rainstorm

    Rainstorm Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 25, 2009
    Lake Placid FLorida
    Quote:Just wondering, is this a still air incubator or does it have a fan? The differences that you experience sound like a still air unit to me, if so then you will want the optimum temperature at the height of the top of the eggs not close to the thermostat or heating element. It is very critical to maintain the correct temperature at the level of the eggs. With a forced air unit usually the differences are much less.

    Still air, and the thermometer is on top of the eggs, I sat a small piece of paper on top of them and laid the thermometer there, so when you say level of eggs, its better to have it ON the turner?
     
  5. skillet_scramble

    skillet_scramble Out Of The Brooder

    31
    0
    22
    Nov 18, 2009
    SE Texas or Angola
    Quote:Just wondering, is this a still air incubator or does it have a fan? The differences that you experience sound like a still air unit to me, if so then you will want the optimum temperature at the height of the top of the eggs not close to the thermostat or heating element. It is very critical to maintain the correct temperature at the level of the eggs. With a forced air unit usually the differences are much less.

    Still air, and the thermometer is on top of the eggs, I sat a small piece of paper on top of them and laid the thermometer there, so when you say level of eggs, its better to have it ON the turner?

    No, actually where you have it on top of the eggs is the correct location for it. If both are together at the same height and reading different temps then I would imagine that one is incorrect. You might try one more but make sure it's for incubation. They seem to be more accurate. If you have a local Tractor Supply or feed store that carries them it will still only cost about $12-15 for a good one. Definitely worth the extra money. I have hatched turkeys in a wooden box and controlled the temp with a thermostat and a light but the incubators with the fans will surely provide a more even temp that is easier to regulate. You will still get a good hatch if you continue to monitor the temp closely and it sounds like you have an egg turner so that is a good thing, just remember to remove it on the 17th or 18th day to prevent any injuries should the chicks hatch when you are not looking at them. Leave the hatchlings in until they are completely dry before moving to your brooder setup whatever that may be and don't be tempted to "help" them hatch because it can cause bleeding that can lead to a mortality. Some will seem to pop out while others may take all day

    p.s. I'm not familiar with ducks so I'm not sure about the misting.
     
  6. skillet_scramble

    skillet_scramble Out Of The Brooder

    31
    0
    22
    Nov 18, 2009
    SE Texas or Angola

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