Duck Pond Filter & Shower with lots of pictures.

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by OldGuy43, Oct 15, 2012.

  1. OldGuy43

    OldGuy43 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Here it is! The long awaited instructions on how to make a filter and shower for your quackers. Sorry it took so long, but I wanted to work out all of the bugs before posting.

    The first thing you'll need is something to support the filter/shower head. I was lucky enough to find one of the posts that realtors use to put up for sale signs.
    [​IMG]
    I had to cut it off and than coated the bottom end with that asphalt based pruning paint and set it in Speedcrete.

    Next came the pond itself. I used the middle sized one from WalMart that is about 5' across. I buried it almost down to grade level so that I didn't have to fool with a ramp.

    Next came selecting the pump. This was a real problem and I tried several. The one that worked best was a Pacific Hydrostar 3/5 H.P. submersible dirty water pump that I found at Harbor Freight for $50 on sale. (Item 69298 http://www.harborfreight.com/35-horsepower-dirty-water-pump-with-float-switch-69298.html ) These go on sale every two or three months so do not pay the full price. (I think it's almost $100) I recommend buying the extended warranty. The quality control is not the greatest and I went through 4 before finding one that worked reliably.
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    Next came plumbing the pump. The outlet is 1-1/4" and comes with a NPT adapter. I tried several variations and ended up with this.
    [​IMG]
    There are two valves on there and, yes you will need both of them. If I had it to do over I'd probably reduce the 1-1/4" outlet right at the pump and use smaller valves and piping.to reduce costs. The smaller piece of PVC pipe at the top is 3/4" with a 1" i.d. piece of vinyl tubing forced on. I made it tall to facilitate picking up the pump.

    Next comes the combination filter and shower head. That's just a 5 gallon bucket with holes in the bottom and an elbow on the side about 1/3 to 1/2 way up. Again, trust me. You want the elbow otherwise you can pump all the water out of the pond. Just buy a threaded fitting and drill a hole a little undersized and twist it in. As for the holes in the bottom I tried lots of different sizes and found that 1/2" works the best.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I tried lots of stuff for a filter medium and finally found that a single layer of aluminum screen wire works best.
    [​IMG]
    Just cut it over-sized (I just turned the bucket over and used it as a quide cutting about 2" around.) than push it into the bottom of the bucket and form it into the edges with your hand.
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    Next take the lid and drill an oversized hole in the center to put your vinyl tubing in.
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    One more thing and your filter is done. Slide the plastic handle off to the side and put a slight bend in the wire handle of the bucket right in the center of the top to keep the bucket hanging level.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Now you'll need something to keep the tubing from kinking when it goes over the top. I used 2, 4" elbows and a J hook pipe hanger to keep it in place like this.
    [​IMG]
    You'll want the elbows way oversized, otherwise it's really hard to push the tubing through.

    Now a couple of safety suggestions. Not absolutely necessary, but why take the chance? First, install a GFI plug for your pump. Second, get a piece of the plastic stuff that they use in cars to protect the wire from chafing. Install it where it passes over the hook. Last, put a dab of silicone grease on the plug if it's outdoors just to give it a little extra waterproofing.

    We're almost done. Cut the vinyl tubing on a bias so that it almost reaches the bottom of the filter bucket and feed it in. Plug in the pump and adjust the valves.
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    Since the pump is designed to be used as a sump pump it has a float switch. You'll need to keep the float upright to make the pump run continuously.
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    I solved the problem by just using a piece of bailing wire and wiring it to the plumbing.

    Now you should have something that looks like this.
    [​IMG]

    I end up cleaning the filter most days, but that only takes about 5 minutes as opposed to changing out the pool twice a day. When I need to clean the pool (every 3-5 days) this setup makes that easier and faster too. Just pull the tubing out and point it outside the run. Close the valve for the side that goes into the pool and open the top valve all the way. Turn on the pump. Use a garden hose to stir the muck off the bottom and Presto! [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Questions, comments and observations welcome.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2012
  2. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  3. OldGuy43

    OldGuy43 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Whoops, almost forgot. Since the pump is designed to be used as a sump pump it has a float switch. You'll need to keep the float upright to make the pump run continuously.
    [​IMG]
    I solved the problem by wiring it to the plumbing. I'll edit the instructions to add this info. [​IMG]
     
  4. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    What a great idea [​IMG]
     
  5. 1MrsMagoo

    1MrsMagoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well Done!![​IMG]
     
  6. OldGuy43

    OldGuy43 Chillin' With My Peeps

    One more plus that I forgot to mention in my initial post. Having one of these keeps mosquitoes from using your duck pond as a larvae nursery. [​IMG]
     
  7. sherrik9

    sherrik9 Out Of The Brooder

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    Great idea. I think the circulating water should also keep the pond from freezing. We don't normally get much below freezing so this should be perfect. thanks for sharing
     
  8. donnavee

    donnavee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do you ducks try to chew on any of the wires, etc.? We have a kiddie pool that has a plug type drain in it, and if we forget to cover it with a rock they manage to work it loose and the nice fresh pool of water we just ran is gone.
     
  9. OldGuy43

    OldGuy43 Chillin' With My Peeps

    No, not really. That was one of the things that worried me when I started this project, but it never has been a problem.
     
  10. donnavee

    donnavee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh, forgot to ask - how many quackers do you have?
     

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