Duckling leg got hurt.

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Homie Ducks, Jul 30, 2014.

  1. Homie Ducks

    Homie Ducks Chirping

    184
    8
    63
    Jul 30, 2014
    Pakistan
    My duck's leg has hurt , it walks two steps and then lies down on floor . What should i do ?
     
  2. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners

    23,193
    2,459
    511
    Jan 3, 2010
    Southern New England
    Did you see it get hurt? If so, can you tell us what happened?

    If you did not see an injury, it could be the duckling needs more B vitamins. What is the food you use? You can get brewer's yeast and add a tablespoon of that once a day to the food (per three ducklings is my best guess). Or you can add 100 to 150 mg of plain niacin powder per gallon of drinking water for 8 weeks.
     
  3. Homie Ducks

    Homie Ducks Chirping

    184
    8
    63
    Jul 30, 2014
    Pakistan
    @AmigaThe duckling striked with brick as i was carrying it back to cage ; there is no bleeding or any wound and no bone fracture , i think the injury is not serious but can you tell me how many days it will take to become normal again . I use to give them boiled vegetables , rice , oats and tomatoes .Usually they are crazy on eating vegetables and fruits
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2014
  4. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners

    23,193
    2,459
    511
    Jan 3, 2010
    Southern New England
    If you can get a good chick starter crumble that will help, as it will have a wider variety of vitamins and more protein. We don't want too much protein, but even 18 to 20% is good for ducklings their first three weeks.

    Sounds like they get outside so that they can eat some sand and tiny pebbles so they can digest their food. That's good.

    If you cannot find starter crumble or grower food at a feed store (I know some places don't have this), take a look at the article I copy at the bottom of this message, about feeding your flock. I think you really need them to be getting more protein and B vitamins.

    For the injury, get some Epsom salt. Be careful, do not let them eat it, it is a laxative!

    But if you dissolve a tablespoon of Epsom salt in a half cup of warm water, soak a clean rag in that, then wrap the rag around the leg and foot and hold the baby duck for ten minutes that is a helpful thing to do, three times a day.

    Leg sprains or muscle pulls can take several days to heal, and the Epsom salt helps. Also, if you have comfrey herb, mash that up and hold it on the outside of the leg like you would do the Epsom salt in a rag. That is said to help muscles.

    From Joybilee Farm
    Feed Mix recipe:
    When supplements are needed, in winter, during gestation or early lactation, for instance, this is the feed that we use:
    1 part whole wheat
    1 part whole oats
    1 part whole barley
    1/2 part whole flax seed
    1 part whole or split peas, garbanzo beans or other pulse (not soy)
    Keeping the grains whole ensures that the oils in the grain don’t go rancid. Ruminants will digest the whole grains in their rumens. Chickens need grit to digest these grains. For young chicks and growing pullets we feed ground grains and increase the protein by soaking in milk or yogourt overnight before feeding it.
    If you are concerned about pesticide and herbicide use you can go with certified organic ingredients. If expense is a concern conventional ingredients will still give you GMO-free (not really as there can be contamination in the feed trucks and at the storage facility). You can’t advertise this as GMO-free, but you can explain what you are doing to your customers. Our customers appreciate knowing the rational behind our feeding decisions.
    Using this as a basic guide, you can switch out ingredients to take advantage of price drops — sunflower seeds can be added to increase protein and vitamin E during early lactation. The pulses can be switched out to home grown — If you don’t have a combine, most of us don’t, harvest while the seed is still immature, by taking the whole above ground plant and drying it as hay. There may be some shattering of seed, but there is protein in the plants and the seed can be cleaned up by your chickens.
    Field peas and desi garbanzo bean can be grown even if you get some summer frost. These plants can withstand light frost. If you have a warmer climate you can pick a bean that can withstand warmer temperatures during the growing season.
     
  5. Homie Ducks

    Homie Ducks Chirping

    184
    8
    63
    Jul 30, 2014
    Pakistan
    Thanx alot :)
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: