Duckling with severe eye trauma

DarkWater1929

Songster
6 Years
Jan 27, 2015
208
150
171
Redding, California
Hi everyone! I must apologize for the fact that I only ever seem to be here when I need help, these days. It's just that my only internet is my phone. I avoid browsing, as it is a pain.

Anyway, one of our ducklings was, at breakfast this morning, sitting alone, eyes closed, looking miserable. He was easy to catch (somehow the baby seems like a boy to me), though that made his mama MAD!

Upon examination, I discovered that one of his eyes was crusted shut with lots of green goopy stuff, and that the green goop was all over his side, as though he had been wiping it there for at least a day or so. I took him into the house, and gently rinsed his eye until it came open. I am still appalled to have discovered that his eyeball is no longer a ball. It looked more like a gray raisin.

I immediately stopped rinsing the eye, not having any idea whether this is the correct thing to do for an eye puncture. However, before I had time to react, I noticed a flap of some kind of flesh protruding from between his eyelids. It withdrew immediately, and I still don't know what it was.

I hope that I have not done the wrong thing!

Bcause the discharge from his eye was so green and goopy, I concluded that he must have an infection. The only opthalmic medication that we have on hand, is what we use to put in the eyes of the Calves, when they have pink eye. It's not actually indicated for calves; it's manufactured for dogs and cats. It's a yellow powder, the name of which I can't recall and which has worn off of the bottle. I applied a small amount of that, directly onto the surface of the eye.

I have taken him to work with me today, in order to keep him from being attacked, given that he has a blind side, and is under the weather. I cannot afford to take him to the vet. he has refused to take the only antibiotic I have handy, LA 300, orally. I don't know whether to inject it, or skip it...? He is not eating or drinking. I am so afraid that he will simply give up. The pain must be horrendous.

I will be grateful for any descriptions of what you, or someone you may know, have done, in similar circumstances. I realize that the situation absolutely screams for veterinary attention. However, even were there a competent avian vet in our area, which I believe there is not, I have no resources presently to afford it. They all require cash payment, upfront, these days.

I thank you very much for your time, and any input you are willing to offer. Thank you!

IMG_20190908_111956.jpg
 

DarkWater1929

Songster
6 Years
Jan 27, 2015
208
150
171
Redding, California
My daughter uses vetracyn for her horses eyes when she gets an eye infection. Has worked great every time! Best of luck.

Thank you so much! I will look for it at the feed store. I admit that I didn't even think to go by there. Since the new law, I have given in to an infuriated attitude of futility about buying medications. That we have been legislated into having to get a permission slip, at great expense, for medications many have used responsibly for decades, is, in my opinion, simply a government sellout to lobbyists. If improper use is the fear, than a required class and subsequent exam to qualify to use these meds is the way to go. It is as outrageous as if they passed laws that only certified professional drivers could drive, forcing everyone else to pay to be driven places. Yes, there would be fewer tragic accidents. But most people would then be confined to walking-distance destinations. So it is with medications. I have seen a licensed, experienced, veterinarian place her hand down on the rail of a feces-covered squeeze chute, before sticking it back into the cow she was performing surgery on. She (the cow) died soon after. I would not have done that. But she is qualified; I am not.

But I digress. Thank you again.
 

Mybackyardpeepers

Free Ranging
Mar 22, 2019
2,750
9,108
507
Michigan
Thank you so much! I will look for it at the feed store. I admit that I didn't even think to go by there. Since the new law, I have given in to an infuriated attitude of futility about buying medications. That we have been legislated into having to get a permission slip, at great expense, for medications many have used responsibly for decades, is, in my opinion, simply a government sellout to lobbyists. If improper use is the fear, than a required class and subsequent exam to qualify to use these meds is the way to go. It is as outrageous as if they passed laws that only certified professional drivers could drive, forcing everyone else to pay to be driven places. Yes, there would be fewer tragic accidents. But most people would then be confined to walking-distance destinations. So it is with medications. I have seen a licensed, experienced, veterinarian place her hand down on the rail of a feces-covered squeeze chute, before sticking it back into the cow she was performing surgery on. She (the cow) died soon after. I would not have done that. But she is qualified; I am not.

But I digress. Thank you again.
Yes I agree. Just so you are aware it doesn't have to say for eyes or even for chickens, it is all the same thing.
 

glassdragonfly

Crowing
Sep 3, 2019
837
1,693
377
Ozark,mo
Hi! I used an antibiotic eye ointment for cats on my rooster Hawkie's eye. He lost most of his eyesight but it was badly scratched so I figured he would. But no infection! He's well adjusted now and doing great.
The flap you saw was probably the third eye lid. Hope he starts feeling better,eating and drinking.Glad you could take him to work with you.
 

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