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Ducks and "Black Chickens" for the Asian market.

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by RoosterGeek, May 3, 2011.

  1. RoosterGeek

    RoosterGeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 31, 2010
    Lebanon, TN
    I have been approached by a Chinese professor wanted me to raise ducks for him to buy.

    He wants to buy them live from me. This person also says that there is difficulty in sourcing live ducks for consumption in our area.

    I told him I would probably sell chickens for 3.50 /lb and he didn't flinch.

    He was interested in live ducks at about 15 bucks a piece. I would probably do Pekin ducks due to feed conversion efficiency.

    He enthusiastically encouraged me to think about it and said that he would get customers up for me.


    I'm definitely interested. Any advice or criticism?
     
  2. Connorrm

    Connorrm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Capital District, NY
    By Black Chickens - I'm assuming he means Silkies....those are VERY popular in China for medicinal reasons.
     
  3. PotterWatch

    PotterWatch My Patronus is a Chicken

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    As long as you have looked at what it costs for you to raise them, including the cost of extra pens and/or coop space, and found that the profit margin is something you would be happy with, go for it! I would be thrilled if someone wanted to buy live birds from us, it would save me tons of time and work doing the processing.
     
  4. Baymule

    Baymule Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Northeast Texas
    Go for it!!
     
  5. PineappleMama

    PineappleMama Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dang wish we could pull something like that off... *sigh* someday!
     
  6. RoosterGeek

    RoosterGeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lebanon, TN
    Quote:Yeah, he does mean Silkies. He even suggested that I have my wife eat some for fertility! I told him we don't need any of that at my age! I'm 28. lol.

    The biggest plus is that I would have reduced overhead concerning processing. I would let them free range within poultry netting so would be less I would have to buy. I already have a 10x12 Salatin style tractor I could do for the chickens. I haven't looked at grain pricing and I have no delusion about that aspect of cost. My ducks were able to glean a lot of their food last summer from the 3 acre field next door. We actually did not feed them at all and they were very healthy. I do know that this would be a different situation overall and would require feed.

    I'm guessing requiring a deposit would be the safest route to go. Is that what those of you do that raise birds commercially? Should I give referral discounts? I know Joel gives 3% off for hosting meat pickups.

    I'll check out what the local stores sell frozen, processed duck for and update this thread.

    Thanks for the responses thus far!
     
  7. PotterWatch

    PotterWatch My Patronus is a Chicken

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    We have a policy that if someone orders a large number of birds or places a specialty order (people who want soy-free or other specialty food must place an order of at least 30 birds), we don't require a deposit unless they have reneged on a previous order. Basically, we will let them burn us once but will require a deposit if they wish to order again in the future.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2011
  8. Connorrm

    Connorrm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Capital District, NY
    Yes, I wouldn't do anything without a deposit. I was thinking I would charge him upfront the cost of the baby chicks/ducks - as the deposit. Less upfront cost for you, imho.

    Then you have time to watch them grow and figure out what you've spent on feeding them while you watch the in-store prices.
     

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