Ducks and Free Range Fencing

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Midol, Dec 28, 2007.

  1. Midol

    Midol New Egg

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    Dec 27, 2007
    Heya,

    When I was originally researching ducks (white pekins) I was under the impression that they could be free ranged in the same way that our Chickens were, without fences.

    With out Chickens we locked them into a smallish house thing at night (say about 10ft*3.5ft and about 3ft tall. However, I am reading now that my ducks will roam quite a distance from the house thing. We have 10 acres and the ducks house would be kept smack bang in the middle.

    Anyway, they can't jump at all so how high fencing could I go? Would 2ft be high enough?

    It doesn't need to keep predators out as they are locked away at night.

    I've got a trio - 2 females and a male and they are being bred for meat. They are hiding in the trees in the rain right now inside my dogs fenced area but I need to get the fencing on the property sorted out ASAP as he can't go out there or he'll eat them.

    I think that's all that is important for now. I'll be moving them into the house tonight and out of the dogs area.

    ps, I did multiple searches using terms such as "ducks freerange" "fencing ducks" "freerange duck fencing".

    Cheers,
    Michael!
     
  2. Picco

    Picco Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 14, 2007
    NY
    You're right, ducks don't have the same roosting instinct as chickens and they tend to wander. They will usually stay close to a body of water though. They can be trained to return at night after a while using a food reward and following a feeding routine but it doesn't always work. Pekins are heavy and can't jump or fly, but if they have enough of a running start they can clear a short fence. I would go with a 4ft fence to be safe. You can build a duck tractor too.
     
  3. Midol

    Midol New Egg

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    Dec 27, 2007
    Ahhh, this makes it a little harder.

    I'll check out the pricing for 4ft fencing, over 700m of it so if its too expensive then I might have to fence in a smaller area for them down the back.

    Cheers,
    Michael.
     
  4. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Wouldn't your dog be able to get over a 2 foot fence? Since they are a heavy meat breed, maybe a kiddie pool, treats near home, one wing clipped and a mudpuddle will keep them in?
     
  5. Midol

    Midol New Egg

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    Dec 27, 2007
    Yeah, easily. But he isn't allowed to roam.

    There is a small fenced section outside of my bedroom with 6'6'' fencing for the dog then I was going to put fencing around the entire perimeter to keep the ducks in - my dogs a Siberian Husky so will kill any poultry instantly if he gets access to them which is why he was locked inside when they were in his fenced area.

    If I were to try the kiddy pool/mud puddle idea how would I do it? With the chickens we let them out of their house 15 minutes before dark the first time and they rounded them up at dark then from then on they came back at night.

    My mum also said I can fence in a section down the back and put in a nice sized pond and build a hutch/house for them, that's no big deal either and that's how the guy we bought them off had his setup.
     
  6. KingsCalls

    KingsCalls Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 22, 2007
    New Market,Tn.
    Picco was right about the feeding routine....If you get them use to being fed at a certain time and place most of the time ducks will be there near that time. You will have to make it routine for a week or so before you give them free run of the whole place tho! I had Mallards on my pond that I raised from ducklings, I always fed them at the same time and same place before I let them stay at the pond. When I drove up the driveway after work they would beat me to the backyard!!!! The pond was near the bottom of the driveway and my driveway is approx. 1000 feet long! Most days I would see them fly over my truck on their way to the backyard..
     

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