Ducks and Survival

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by meldelfc, Apr 25, 2011.

  1. meldelfc

    meldelfc Out Of The Brooder

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    I was talking to a friend online about TEOTWAWKI. He informed me that Runner ducks were best for survival because they do not require the amount of sunlight that chickens do to lay eggs. They are suppose to lay regularly even during the winter. Can anyone confirm or deny this for me? I have been unable to find any information online.
     
  2. scratch'n'peck

    scratch'n'peck Overrun With Chickens

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    we had lots of frozen runner duck eggs over the winter
     
  3. FarmrGirl

    FarmrGirl MooseMistress

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    yes, Runners lay eggs all year long. Mine lay an egg a day. So do Pekin, Campbells, Harlequin, and several others. Of course there are many chicken breeds that lay year round too: RIR, Leghorn, Orphington, Red Comet, etc. But ducks will produce eggs at a higher capacity far longer than chickens will.

    What do you mean "for survival"?
     
  4. FarmrGirl

    FarmrGirl MooseMistress

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    scratch'n'peck :

    we had lots of frozen runner duck eggs over the winter

    LOL! don't you hate it when they freeze before you can get out there? I can still thaw them to cook but the shells will crack when frozen so it's got to be within a few days. They cook fine, but the whites are more watery when they hit the pan.​
     
  5. FarmrGirl

    FarmrGirl MooseMistress

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    scratch'n'peck :

    we had lots of frozen runner duck eggs over the winter

    LOL! don't you hate it when they freeze before you can get out there? I can still thaw them to cook but the shells will crack when frozen so it's got to be within a few days. They cook fine, but the whites are more watery when they hit the pan.​
     
  6. FarmrGirl

    FarmrGirl MooseMistress

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    scratch'n'peck :

    we had lots of frozen runner duck eggs over the winter

    LOL! don't you hate it when they freeze before you can get out there? I can still thaw them to cook but the shells will crack when frozen so it's got to be within a few days. They cook fine, but the whites are more watery when they hit the pan.​
     
  7. FarmrGirl

    FarmrGirl MooseMistress

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    Jul 1, 2009
    Southern Maryland
    scratch'n'peck :

    we had lots of frozen runner duck eggs over the winter

    LOL! don't you hate it when they freeze before you can get out there? I can still thaw them to cook but the shells will crack when frozen so it's got to be within a few days. They cook fine, but the whites are more watery when they hit the pan.​
     
  8. meldelfc

    meldelfc Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 21, 2011
    Quote:TEOTWAWKI= The end of the world as we know it. With the "pending" doom of 2012, the quakes, economy, etc, survival of any future diasters.
    My idea of survival is to be self-sustaining in the event of a diaster.
     
  9. maralynn28

    maralynn28 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Don't know about runners, but considering I live in the great Northwest- Seattle-area (known for lack of sunlight, lol) I can vouch for Welsh Harlequins and Cayugas. If I remember correctly, my WH laid through to November and started again February...they laid so long I was looking forward to a break, I was so overrun with eggs! lol My Cayuga didn't lay as late but started just as early. Got an egg a day from all of them. This year I have Khaki Campbells which are known to be best egg layers, so I will let you know how they do...
     
  10. The Duck ABC's

    The Duck ABC's Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I also live in the Pacific Northwest and have Saxonies. My birds layed all winter, never stopped. Some are molting right now, which means they stop laying for a week. Saxonies are a dual purpose duck. They are not only heavy egg layers, but also meat birds. A bird is about 9 pounds! Plus they have less fat tissue then regular domestic ducks. They are also quite winter hardy. We have -8 this winter and they had no issue being outside with provided hay to sit on to protect their feet. They do sleep in a duck house at night.
     

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