Ducks or Geese?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Horsebackrules, Sep 1, 2014.

  1. Horsebackrules

    Horsebackrules Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 12, 2014
    Ok so originally I was going to get 2 ducks but then I considered adding a goose. However, my mom said only two and I couldn't get one of each (no idea...don't ask [​IMG]) So what do you think? I want a good companion that is loyal and affectionate. To me that it's the most important thing. I'd also want them to not be too noisy but the occasional loud honk/quack would be ok. We get cold winters here so they also need to be cold hardy. (I have posted this on the goose thread too but I also want to hear from duck owners!)
     
  2. Amykins

    Amykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Well, if you want sweet and affectionate, ducks are the way to go. There are some geese that can be very sweet, but if they're not handled a bunch and properly socialized they can be downright nasty, attacking everything and everyone who comes into their territory. More often than not they're more aloof than anything else. My duck loves to snuggle and runs to greet me every time I come home! All the geese I've seen just kind of meander the yard, not caring about their humans until it's feeding time.

    On the other hand, I've never owned a goose as a pet, just relaying experiences from my friends who have farms. Perhaps a long-term goose owner can chime in.
     
  3. Kevin565

    Kevin565 Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    My geese have always been much more affectionate then my ducks. However, they've always been much louder then my ducks.
     
  4. Horsebackrules

    Horsebackrules Out Of The Brooder

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    Have the ducks been raised since they were a few days old? Also will a duckling still imprint even if you aren't the first thing it saw?
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2014
  5. Amykins

    Amykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Mine was. I think that makes a huge difference. As for imprinting, it happens within the first couple days, even the first few hours of life! So technically you can, as long as you catch them soon enough and separate them, making sure you're the only thing they see feeding them, touching them,etc. Even if they don't imprint on you though,you can sill get them t bond with you. It's just a little trickier to do if they aren't imprinted on humans.
     
  6. Horsebackrules

    Horsebackrules Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm getting them from a hatchery so I assume they'll either see recently hatched ducklings or a human. But thanks for the advice about separating them! How long would I need to separate them?
     
  7. Amykins

    Amykins Overrun With Chickens

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    If you want people-friendly, hand-reared ducks/geese you'll have to keep them inside in their brooder for several weeks, until they're old enough to join the main flock. Or you could keep them inside forever like I did! :p
     
  8. Horsebackrules

    Horsebackrules Out Of The Brooder

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    Well I don't have a flock to move them to but I will be keeping them inside for 6-8 weeks depending on when they get their feathers. Is that a good amount of time?
     
  9. Horsebackrules

    Horsebackrules Out Of The Brooder

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    How long would I have to keep them separated because I don't want them to get too lonely when I'm at school?
     
  10. TracyLovesDucks

    TracyLovesDucks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What do you mean by separate them, Amykins?

    I think there might be a misunderstanding.

    Horsebackrules - when your babies arrive, do not separate them from each other; you're right, they will get lonely. They need each other. The babies should be kept together. I think what Amykins meant is to seperate them from their mother right after hatching so that they imprint on a human, but you're not doing it this way. You are having the babies shipped to you so this doesn't apply to your situation.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2014

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