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Early Stages of Bumblefoot?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Studio2770, Oct 26, 2013.

  1. Studio2770

    Studio2770 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think a couple of my chickens have bumblefoot. The lumps are sort of soft. The chickens act normal and walk just fine. I'm hoping that Epsom treatment would work.
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  2. my sunwolf

    my sunwolf Chillin' With My Peeps

    It does look like very early stages to me, but it could also be bedding or roosting sores. In addition to the epsom salt soaks, give immune boosters, including probiotics, to help them get over the infection.
     
  3. Studio2770

    Studio2770 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you very much. The first pic is the first chicken I noticed, there's no scab from what I can see when I examined her. I just noticed the second foot today. Could I just get those meds from the store? Would they effect their eggs?
     
  4. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Yes, it does look like it could be the early stages of bumblefoot, or injuries to the foot that bumblefoot bacteria can invade. I would soak each affected foot in an Epsom salt solution, apply antibiotic ointment like Neosporin to any open wounds, and keep the birds in a clean, softly-bedded place. Since you've caught it this early, the bumblefoot should go away without much attention; however, if it gets worse or no better, you may need to inject the foot with an antibiotic (like Penicillin) or perform minor surgery on it in order to solve the problem.
     
  5. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Probiotics can usually be found at a livestock supply store. If you can't get probiotics, give yogurt. Other "immune boosters" include electrolytes and vitamins. If the bumblefoot gets worse, you will probably need antibiotics. Penicillin is a good antibiotic to use for bumblefoot, though it is a rather narrow-range antibiotic (doesn't treat a lot of bacteria). Penicillin would also be found at a livestock supply store. If you treat with Penicillin or any other antibiotic, you should not eat the eggs. The length of time that you shouldn't eat the eggs (the withdrawal period) varies depending on the antibiotic, but is usually around two weeks.
     
  6. Studio2770

    Studio2770 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks! Hopefully we won't need antibiotics because all our layers are the same breed so all the eggs look identical.
     
  7. kgardiner

    kgardiner Out Of The Brooder

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    The injection of penicillin in the foot? I was under the impression the injections were in the meat of the leg, alternating legs to prevent soreness? I just treated my roo with a course of penicillin and that is what I did. Was I mistaken in doing so?
     
  8. BirchMeadow

    BirchMeadow Out Of The Brooder

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    We are currently treating an Orpington with bumblefoot. We caught it very early when we noticed her limping. Took her to the vet since this was our first experience with it. The vet gave her a shot of antibiotics in each foot near the infection and picked the round scab off. She gave us some Silvadene cream to put on it and some stretchy wrap tape that sticks to itself for wraping to keep it clean. It's been a week and she's healing nicely. Bandage changes twice a day for a while and now just once a day. We stopped eating the eggs for a week after she was given the shots.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2013
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Your second picture with the scab looks a little puffy. Chickens get bumblefoot, a staph infection, from a tiny cut in the bottom of the foot, usually from a small rock or sharp surface. I don't usually do surgery unless ther is a limp, or the footpad gets swollen (and sometimes red.) I have tried soaking in epsom salts, and some recommend a product called Tricide Neo online that is used for soaking. I would rather do the surgery since it is over quickly. Penicillin shots into the breast are not usually necessary unless the bumblefoot is advanced. Here is some reading: https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/236649/bumblefoot-surgery-with-pics-and-how-to
     
  10. Studio2770

    Studio2770 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We got the generic version of Neosporin, some wrap(nor vet wrap), Epsom salt. We have gauze. No one limps, which is a good sign. I guess I should I should isolate them? Do I let them forage when they have their foot wrapped?
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2013

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