Easter Egger questions?

cottontail farm

Songster
5 Years
Dec 26, 2014
808
1,172
241
Rural NW Pa
Ok, can someone please dumb this down for me. I just set 18 blue eggs from my EE hens. My rooster is a mix with a single comb (possibly part leghorn) I understand EE's are mixed as well but they seem to consistently have pea combs...
So I have a bunch of blue eggs from a mixed mom and mixed dad.
Can someone tell me how one earth this works when you're breeding a mixed breed to another mixed breed? Is the pea comb dominate and the chicks will have pea combs? What about shell color? Leg color? My head hurts thinking about it but I'm so excited to see what hatches.
 

jolenesdad

Free Ranging
Premium member
Apr 12, 2015
2,264
8,327
542
Montgomery, TX
Most all of the traits are a grab bag with mixed ancestry on both sides.

Egg shell color for blue Is a “dominant” gene so you just need one copy for a colored egg.

your Easter egger females could have two copies of the blue egg gene, but likely just one. Either way, their offspring has a 50% chance of laying a colored egg at minimum when the hen lays a blue egg.
 

Amer

Enabler
Nov 8, 2017
3,817
51,609
1,157
Wisconsin
My Coop
My Coop
Pea comb is dominant. You may get a fifty fifty mix in that trait.
Blue legs are sexlinked, meaning pullets can inherit them from their father, while cockerels need a gene from both sides. Yellow legs are recessive.
This is the simplest way I can explain it, but it's a bit more complicated.
Father single pp xmother pea PP
All pea combs Pp

Father single ppxmother pea Pp
50 percent pea Pp
50 percent single pp

Blue legs in pullets are always inherited from the father.

Father white legs IdIdxmother blue id
Cockerels white Idid
Pullets white Id

Father white legs Ididxmother blue id
Cockerels white legs Idid
Cockerels blue legs idid
Pullets white legs Id
Pullets blue legs id

It could be a great mixed bag, depending on your father's genes.

Egg color
It's hard to say, but I'm assuming some blues and some whites, depending upon the genetics of your sire.

male white ooxhen blue OO
Pullets Oo blue

Male white ooxhen blue Oo
Pullets Oo blue
Pullets oo white

And we have to take into account that I don't know if your sire is actually a blue egg layer.
 

nicalandia

Crowing
10 Years
Jul 16, 2009
7,570
2,107
406
Stuck In a Dream
My Coop
My Coop
I understand EE's are mixed as well but they seem to consistently have pea combs...

Is the pea comb dominate and the chicks will have pea combs? What about shell color? Leg color? My head hurts thinking about it but I'm so excited to see what hatches.
Easter Eggers were brought from South America in the 1930s, Mostly Quechua strains with pea combs, the blue egg shell gene is either linked to the Pea Comb(on breeds like Quechua, Araucana, Colloncas, Ameraucanas) or to the Single Comb on breeds like Cream Legbars, Isbars.

Close linkage means that they don't segregate independently as most genes do, the linkage is measured in centimorgan or MapUnits, one map unit means 1%, in the case of Araucanas and EEs the Blue egg shell mutation O(for Oocyan), the linkage is estimated to be around 3-4% chance of crossing over or genetic recombination, when crossing a Ameraucana to a Leghorn 100% of the progeny will be heterozygous for the pea comb and the blue egg shell gene(P/p+, O/o+) This F1s when crossed to say another Leghorn(which is a project of mine I must say) will produce 50% Pea Comb Progeny, the linkage of P and O means that almost all(around 96%) of the pea comb hens with pea comb will inherit the Blue egg shell gene.




Interestingly enough there is another mutation on the same region by the same retrovirus that occurred independently on Asian breeds like Dongxiang)
Parallel ERV-mediated evolution of blue egg color in chickens



Locating Pea Comb and Blue Egg in Relation to the Centromere of Chromosome 1 in the Chicken1
 

Latest posts

Top Bottom